CEG Industry Blog

10 Majors That Can Help Your Business That Aren't Engineering Related

Engineering is not the only field that is important to the success of your business.

📅   Fri April 14, 2017 - Edition


Companies are finding it beneficial to have their own environmental compliance officer.
Companies are finding it beneficial to have their own environmental compliance officer.
Companies are finding it beneficial to have their own environmental compliance officer. Hiring someone with a construction management degree can ensure efficient operations across the board

Construction company owners tend to focus on engineering degrees when looking at the qualifications of new recruits. After all, the hands-on skills learned through these programs are incredibly useful around the average jobsite. However, it's not the only field that is important to the success of your business.

1. Construction Management

Although you'll probably take care of the brunt of your business management needs, hiring an assistant with an associate or bachelor's degree in Construction Management can ensure efficient operations across the board. The two-year program focuses on blueprint reading, workforce supervision and jobsite management.

Students interested in running their own construction business in the future would likely benefit more from the four-year bachelor program, which revolves around financial control, site surveying and general business leadership.

2. Solar Technician

While all forms of alternative energy are gaining popularity, solar is still the most widely used. In a nation on the cusp of harnessing sunlight en masse, alternate energy is a great trade to learn. Apart from offering job stability and security well into the future, workers who choose this path gain exposure to new, cutting-edge projects and next-gen building design.

3. Data Analysis

Hard data is just as relevant to the construction industry as any other profession. By collecting and collating real-time datafrom numerous sources, including project invoices, receipts, employees and CAD software, business owners can utilize this data to jumpstart productivity to new heights.

It takes a trained professional to separate the useless information from the valuable insight. Although the role of the data analyst is constantly evolving, it's one that is highly useful when used on a full-time basis.

4. Marketing

Some construction companies rely solely on the community-at-large to advertise their business. Word-of-mouth, personalized recommendations and postings on local bulletin boards are the lifeblood of these business leaders, many of whom are steeped in tradition. While this is a highly profitable practice for some, others enlist the help of professional marketers who utilize modern marketing techniques to gain exposure among larger and more diversified demographics.

5. Business Administration

General business administration is a critical component of any operation. This multidisciplinary degree provides students with a versatile profile that revolves around financial management, workforce development and business leadership. It instills strong skills in problem-solving, conflict resolution and corporate ethics.

6. Compressor Technician

With so much valuable hardware around the modern construction site, it can be easy to lose track of individual components. The problem is compounded when a single person is responsible for multiple machines. To avoid these pitfalls and to minimize any resulting downtime, it's a good idea to pursue equipment-specific certification for your most valuable employees.

With such a specialized field, you have a limited pool from which to select graduates. Consider this input from a recent graduate:

"There's less than a handful of schools that actually provide the hands-on experience as CPI (Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science and Technology) does. And with the student to instructor ratio, it gives us multiple opportunities to work one-on-one with the instructors." -- Jonathon Gage, Lewistown, PA

7. Finance and Accounting

While there are many degrees that provide an introductory education in finance, keeping a full-time accountant on your staff can go a long way when trying to gain better visibility over company spending and reducing operational expenses. Financial specialists are also highly useful in project budgeting and determining the long-term sustainability of your construction company.

8. International Business

Those who want to expand their presence to an international level might require the skills of a Bachelor or Master in International Management. While some of the core concepts are taught in many MBA programs, the specialized curriculum involved with a BIM or MIM delve into international laws and regulations, global business ethics, cultural sensitivity and worldwide sustainability.

9. Environmental Compliance

As the world begins to embrace sustainability and eco-friendly operations, some construction companies find it beneficial to staff their own environmental compliance officer. Many professionals work for the government, an insurance company or another federal employer, but those who work within the green construction sector benefit immensely from the help of a full-time specialist.

10. Materials Management

The process of managing construction materials, which includes the initial sourcing, purchasing, forecasting, storing and allocating the supplies needed for each job, can make or break a construction company. Although the field is only expected to see a 2% increase in growth between 2014 and 2024, it's a job that is always in demand.

Interjecting Variety and Versatility Into Your Workforce

Apart from filling mission-critical roles and vital functions within your business, the degrees mentioned here can work wonders when diversifying your workforce, bolstering the versatility of individual employees and ensuring your ability to take on jobs of varying size, scope and scale.

While they might not be necessary to your success in the industry, they can go a long way when positioning yourself in a highly competitive field. —CEG blog