Manhattan Road & Bridge Uses Grove GHC75 for Drilled-Shaft Installation

The GHC75 is so portable that it can be easily moved to another location in one or two loads.

📅   Fri November 04, 2016 - West Edition


Manhattan Road & Bridge uses a Grove GHC75 rented from Kirby-Smith Machinery for drilled-shaft installation. The 70-ton-capacity crawler features a robust, four-section main boom that extends from 36 to 118 ft. (11 to 36 m) and can telescope under load.
Manhattan Road & Bridge uses a Grove GHC75 rented from Kirby-Smith Machinery for drilled-shaft installation. The 70-ton-capacity crawler features a robust, four-section main boom that extends from 36 to 118 ft. (11 to 36 m) and can telescope under load.

Nearly eight years ago, three Oklahoma and Arkansas construction companies combined forces to become Manhattan Road & Bridge. The owners of the original businesses wanted to do larger projects, and partnering allowed them to accomplish that goal.

In the past seven years, Manhattan Road & Bridge's portfolio of projects totaled close to $1 billion worth of work in the governmental, private, railroad, bridge and port and dock sectors. Manhattan Road & Bridge is based in Tulsa, Okla., and has offices in Oklahoma City, Little Rock and Springdale, Ark., as well as Fort Myers, Fla. The company offers general contracting as well as design-build and construction management. Its extensive list of services involves turnkey road and bridge projects, bridge-repair services and pile-driving capacities of any design.

Manhattan Road & Bridge's territory covers Arkansas, southern Kansas, northern Texas, Oklahoma and Florida. Recent projects include work along Interstate 35 in the Norman, Okla., area where the company installed drilled shafts for high-mast light poles. Each shaft measured nearly 36-ft. (11 m) deep and 54 in. (137 cm) in diameter.

“After digging a pilot hole, we used a Grove GHC75 crane with a hammer attached to drive the casing into the hole,” said Landry Logan project manager. “When that was done, we finished drilling and used the crane to set steel. Then, we poured concrete to a certain height and pulled the casing out.”

Easy Transport

Manhattan rented the 70-ton (63.5 t)-capacity Grove GHC75 crawler for that project from Kirby-Smith Machinery, working with Todd York, crane division account manager. The crane features a robust, four-section main boom that extends from 36 to 118 ft. (11 to 36 m) and can telescope under load.

A standard 26-ft. 3-in. (8 m) offsettable swingaway boom extension has offsets at zero, 20 and 40 degrees. The GHC75 has a maximum tip height of 151 ft. (46 m) with the main boom and extension.

“We used the crane on a similar project in Oklahoma City,” recalled Logan. “The drill shafts there were 60 inches in diameter and from 36- to 58-feet deep. The GHC75 easily handled the workload, but the biggest advantages were mobility and quick set up. We didn't have to break down the crane to transport it. We just loaded it up on a trailer and moved to the next stop.”

The GHC75 is so portable that it can be easily moved to another location in one or two loads. The upper counterweight is removed or installed hydraulically, and the carbody counterweight installs easily via a self-assembly system. The crane's compact design provides greater versatility to work on a wide variety of projects and job sites.

“One load was all it took for us to move to the next place,” Logan said. “We kept the counterweight on during transport. That meant quick setup and a short turnaround time to begin production once we got to a new location.”

Operators Enjoy the Experience

With the hammer and casings, picks generally weigh around 35,000 lbs. (15,875 kg). Operator Jesus Nunez said the farthest he telescoped out on recent projects was approximately 85 ft. (26 m) of boom.

“Everything was well within the crane's capabilities,” Nunez said. “The machine tells you how much boom you have out and how much you can pick, so you don't have to use a load chart. There's no guessing. I really liked running it, and the comfort was very good.”

Grove designed the operator cab to deliver maximum comfort while incorporating conveniently located joystick controls for precise operation. The cab tilts up to 20 degrees and comes equipped with a rated-capacity limiter, air-suspension seat, color monitor for up to four cameras and precise climate control.

“The joystick controls make it easy to run,” said operator Chris Mitchell. “It's comfortable, with plenty of leg room and good visibility to see the pick. The crane has excellent maneuverability and mobility. Overall, I'm impressed.”