NYC Mayor Signs Bill Affecting DOT and Construction Safety Operations

📅   Mon May 15, 2017 - National Edition



Mayor Bill de Blasio today held public hearings for, and signed, fourteen pieces of legislation into law

Intro. 648-A requires landlords to post a record of bedbug infestations in their buildings and provide any tenant signing a lease with bedbug history; Intro. 891-A gives businesses the option to be informed by text or email if they receive a 3-1-1 complaint; Intro. 1311-A requires DOT to notify NYPD and FDNY about resurfacing; Intro. 965-A requires DOT to create a citywide transit study. In particular, focusing on how to bring increased transit to less well served communities; Intro. 1254-A requires that information about college savings plans be sent home with Pre-K students and requires DOHMH to send this information to families within 3 months of a birth; Intro. 1224-A increases the types of contracts that require vendors to fill out questionnaires; Intro. 1271-A requires vendors to submit information to VENDEX digitally; Intro. 1324-A requires MOCS to post information about City of New York contracts and contractors online; Intro. 81-A requires DOB to notify OSHA about Construction Code violations that may endanger workers; Intro. 1433-A requires DOB to list online incidents that have occurred on a construction site; Intro. 1448-A, requires construction superintendents for all major projects at buildings over three stories; Intro. 1421-A requires certain types of complex cranes to have GPS or other locating devices or for DOB to be notified when these cranes are moved on or off a work site; Intro. 1435-A requires certain cranes to be equipped with data-logging equipment to record operations & work conditions; Intro. 1446-A requires Class-B hoisting machine operators to get a license rating to use cranes with a long boom or jib configuration.

“Today we have a mix of bills that improve transparency and public access to information, help create a more equitable and accessible city, increase construction safety, as well as bills involving the web portal used by vendors who do business with the City of New York,” said Mayor de Blasio. "I would like to thank Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and the sponsors of these bills for continuing the fight for transparency, equity, accessibility and safety for all New Yorkers."

“The City Council is proud to support our local vendors and emergency personnel, among the many other residents who will be positively impacted by the legislation being signed this afternoon,” said City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. “Whether it is the construction workers gaining proper safety oversight for their work zones, or the parents of small children who will now be equipped with enhanced college savings information, New Yorkers of all kinds stand to benefit from the outcomes of these initiatives. I thank Mayor de Blasio for signing these essential measures into law today.”

The first bill, Intro. 648-A requires landlords to disclose bedbug infestations in their buildings and provide any tenant signing a lease with bedbug history.

"Bedbug infestations are incredibly grueling experiences, draining tenants and owners of their energy, money and time," said Council Member Daniel Dromm. "Infestations can be particularly stressful for low-income families, seniors, people with disabilities and others who are already facing physical and financial hardship. The more tenants and owners know, the better prepared they will be to take preventative measures and detect any burgeoning infestation. By requiring owners to disclose a property or apartment's bedbug infestation history, my bill ensures that all New Yorkers have access to the information they need to protect themselves from these vermin. The bill offers further protection by requiring owners to distribute tenants with information on bedbug prevention, detection and removal. I thank Mayor de Blasio for supporting this important effort that will protect millions of people from these blood-sucking menaces."

The second bill, Intro. 891-A gives businesses the option to be informed by text or email if a 311 complaint is issued for the address of their building.

"All New Yorkers have government at their fingertips thanks to 311, and this new law will make service requests and complaints more accessible to small business owners," said Gregg Bishop, Commissioner of the NYC Department of Small Business Services. "Small business owners will now be able to receive real-time notifications related to their address, and I applaud Council Member Cornegy and Mayor de Blasio for supporting this common sense measure."

DoITT is proud to be the technical architect of the City's first-ever Small Business First portal, which will make it easier and faster for our city's small businesses to get off the ground, grow, and flourish," said Anne Roest, Commissioner of the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications. "This legislation broadens the portal's capability-and increases its utility-by allowing businesses to keep a close eye on 311 service requests related to their address."

The third bill, Intro. 1311-A requires DOT to notify NYPD and FDNY about resurfacing.

The fourth bill, Intro. 965-A requires DOT to create a citywide transit study. In particular, focusing on how to bring increased transit to less well served communities.

“The lack of adequate transit in some communities can have a hobbling effect on residents and hurt their ability to compete in our growing economy,” said Council Member Ydanis Rodriguez, Chair of the Transportation Committee. “By taking a close look at disconnected communities and thinking about ways to deliver quality transportation services, we can continue to expand opportunity, making a healthier city for all. Intro 965-A is an important step in this process and I look forward to the results of DOT's study.”

The fifth bill, Intro. 1254-A requires that information about college savings plans be sent home with Pre-K students and requires DOHMH to send this information to families within 3 months of a birth.

“As a former educator, I know firsthand that pursuing a postsecondary education has never been more cost-prohibitive. The earlier parents begin saving for their children's postsecondary education, the higher the possibility that their children will receive one. This legislation is designed to help working families do just that by raising awareness about New York's 529 College Savings Program and other postsecondary education savings plans and financial literacy resources. I am proud to see this impactful legislation signed into law, and I thank Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams for his partnership. I also thank Mayor de Blasio, Speaker Mark-Viverito, and my colleagues in the council for supporting this sensible legislation. Every child deserves the chance to pursue their dreams, and the signing of this bill into law helps make that opportunity possible for more New Yorkers.” Said Council Member Mark Treyger.

The sixth bill, Intro. 1224-A increases the types of contracts that require vendors to fill out questionnaires.

The seventh bill, Intro. 1271-A requires vendors to submit information to VENDEX digitally.

"Procurement reform is never going to be the sexiest issue, but making sure the City contracts effectively and efficiently is an essential part of making government work. My two bills will make it easier for contractors to do business with the City, and even more important, help to ensure that the City spends taxpayer money wisely. Int. 1271-A will move us toward an all-digital procurement process, requiring vendors to fill out their VENDEX procurement questionnaire online. This is a common sense step toward moving our contracting process into the 21st century. It will allow the City to begin to modernize every step of the procurement process, and lays the groundwork for the innovative and cutting-edge new 'Passport' system, which begins this Fiscal Year. Int. 1224-A makes our City contracting process more user-friendly for small businesses by raising the earnings threshold for companies required to fill out a VENDEX questionnaire from $100,000 to $250,000, removing a major hurdle for small businesses doing business with the City," said Council Member Helen Rosenthal.

The eighth bill, Intro. 1324-A requires MOCS to post information about City of New York contracts and contractors online.

"Today's bills will help vendors shift time from managing paper submissions to delivering services to New Yorkers. We look forward to our partnerships with the City Council, especially Chair Rosenthal, creating many more opportunities to introduce procurement innovations." said Director Michael Owh, Mayor's Office of Contract Services.

“Int. 1324-A is another move toward a more transparent New York City,” said Council Member Brad Lander, the Council's Deputy Leader for Policy. “It will make accessing information around city contracts and contractors easier with a much needed digitized, updated system for tracking records. This will ultimately ensure this information is more accessible and open to the public.”

The ninth bill, Intro. 81-A requires DOB to notify OSHA about Construction Code violations that may endanger workers.

"If New York City is going to prevent another 33 construction worker fatalities over the next two years, we need to make sure that the Buildings Department is communicating with OSHA about violations that could jeopardize worker safety. We cannot solve the problem if the left hand is not working together with the right hand." said Council Member Rory I. Lancman.

The tenth bill, Intro. 1433-A requires DOB to list online incidents that have occurred on a construction site.

“Every injury and every death on a construction site must be counted regardless of a violation whether a construction worker or member of the public, everyone must be counted. By counting every injury and death, we'll be able to see who is getting hurt, where and why so that we as a city can make construction safer. We must count every life,” said Council Member Ben Kallos. “While Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Department of Buildings (DOB) count injuries and deaths in different way the city will count everyone requiring reporting within 72 hours about contractors, the incident, nature of work, hours on the job, injuries, who was hurt, collective bargaining rights of those injured, details on the site and more, with fines of up to $25,000 and daily fines of as much as $1,000 for those who fail to report. Thank you to Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and Housing and Buildings Chair Jumaane Williams for their leadership on construction safety and to Mayor de Blasio for his commitment and signing this bill to help make construction safer in our city.”

The eleventh bill, Intro. 1448-A, requires that contractors retain construction superintendents for all major projects at buildings over three stories.

“We're grateful for the Council's partnership on construction safety. The law requiring construction superintendents for all major projects at buildings over three stories will expand safety supervision to an additional 2,300 higher-risk sites citywide. This measure, along with the crane-safety bills signed today, will enshrine in law safety enhancements that DOB has been implementing through regulation. We look forward to working with the Council on additional legislation to improve construction safety and hold accountable bad actors in the construction industry,” said Buildings Commissioner Rick D. Chandler, PE.

The twelfth bill, Intro. 1446-A requires Class-B hoisting machine operators to get a license rating to use certain cranes.

"The one thing all construction workers have in common, whether union or non-union, is that they go into work every day because they are trying to feed their families," said Council Member Jumaane D. Williams, Chair of the Committee on Housing and Buildings. "Just because we are experiencing a construction boom in the City, it doesn't mean that we have to sacrifice safety precautions to keep up with the pace. Intros 1446 and 1448 moves us in the right direction in minimizing harm to workers and the public by requiring safety plans and a safety monitoring program at construction sites, and by strengthening licensing requirements for crane operators. These bills are for all of the workers who didn't make it home after a day on their job site. My hope is that with due diligence and oversight, we can prevent one more family from losing a loved one."

The thirteenth bill, Intro. 1421-A requires certain cranes to have GPS or other locating devices or for DOB to be notified when these cranes are moved on or off a work site.

“This bill will give our City even more tools to ensure that crane incidents, such as the one that took the life of David Wichs in my Council District, will never happen again,” said Council Member Margaret S. Chin, sponsor of 1421-A. “I thank the Mayor for his commitment to construction safety, and I look forward to working with him and others to protect everyone who lives, works and visits our City.”

The fourteenth bill, Intro. 1435-A requires certain cranes to be equipped with data-logging equipment to record operations & work conditions.

For more information, visit www.1nyc.gov