Concrete Additive Demand to Exceed $11 Billion in 2010

Mon January 08, 2007 - National Edition
CEG



World demand for cement and concrete additives is forecast to rise 5.1 percent per year through 2010 to more than $11 billion, an improvement over the performance of the 2000 to 2005 period. Gains will be fueled by the increased acceptance of additive in high-volume developing markets for cement, such as China, India, Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

In more mature markets, higher performance requirements for concrete will prompt greater loadings of additives and the use of higher-value products such as superplasticizers. These and other trends are presented in World Cement & Concrete Additives, a new study of The Freedonia Group Inc., a Cleveland-based industry research firm.

Demand for mineral additives will grow at the fastest pace, fueled by increased utilization of blast furnace slag and fly ash as partial replacement for portland cement. Environmental benefits will be the driving factor, as the use of mineral additives provides a beneficial application for waste materials as well as reducing the energy and emissions required to produce cement.

Gains for chemical and fiber additives will benefit from penetration into new markets in the developing world, as the concrete industries in these countries become more aware of the benefits of additive use, according to the report.

Among the three major world regions, demand for cement and concrete additives in North America will advance at the quickest pace. The United States will be one of the fastest-growing markets for additives, driven by an increased focus on production of more durable concrete and utilization of mineral waste products.

China and India also will rise at an above-average rate. In Japan, the world’s second largest additive market — growth will be restrained by market maturity and weak demand for cement, the report finds.