HCEA Holds Annual Convention, Old Equipment Expo

Mon October 14, 2019 - Northeast Edition #21
CEG



In a live equipment presentation, a coal-fired Port Huron steam engine provides belt-driven power to a 1930s Allis-Chalmers Superior-McCully gyratory crusher fed by a 1926 Link-Belt K-2 crawler crane supplying material to a Barber Greene conveyor which, in turn, loads a 1960 General Motors Euclid Division 91FD R18 end dump truck. This 1942 Bucyrus Erie 15-B shovel is nicknamed “Smiley” in memory of Lakeside Sand and Gravel co-founder Harry “Smiley” Kotkowski, who operated the shovel from the 1950s into the 1970s. Among the more unique machines at the event was this 1943 Huber Manufacturing Company 10-ton three-wheel roller. One of the many Caterpillars on display is this 1929 Model Ten tractor. A 1935 Bates Machine & Tractor Company Steel Mule crawler tractor was on display. Still in working order, this 1948 Allis-Chalmers HD-7W long track crawler loader has been in the Leonard family since 1954 and is the last of its kind known to exist. HCEA archivist Thomas Berry (L) catches up with one of the association’s founders, Keith Haddock, in from Edmonton, Canada, for the International Convention and Old Equipment Exposition.

The Historical Construction Equipment Association (HCEA) held its annual International Convention and Old Equipment Exposition Sept. 13 to 15. The event, which is conducted at various locations throughout the United States and Canada, returned to the association's headquarters facility in Bowling Green, Ohio, for 2019.

The event is held as a meeting place for both antique equipment collectors and fans to meet and admire the vast array of machines on display at the equipment exposition. A unique and fascinating aspect of the event is the opportunity to see a wide range of the antique equipment set up and operating in jobsite settings.

In addition, while reviewing the stationary equipment on display, attendees can track the evolution of construction equipment throughout the years. Machines featured in the exposition ranged from as far back as the 1800's to the 1970s and included examples of equipment manufactured by companies still driving the leading edge of technology in construction today. Also on display were machines built by manufacturers that are remembered only through the restoration efforts of antique equipment collectors.

Attendees visited the vendor area where memorabilia such as watch fobs, antique signs, literature and owners' manuals were available. This year, International Harvester was the featured manufacturer.

Headquartered at 16623 Liberty Hi Road in Bowling Green, Ohio, the HCEA is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the history of the construction, dredging and surface mining equipment that shaped the world.

Members include collectors and antique construction equipment enthusiasts from throughout the United States and Canada along with members from as far away as Africa, Japan and Sweden. The HCEA maintains a museum and archives at its headquarters. The archives include sales and service literature, photographs and other documentation, available for research. In addition, historically significant machines are restored and exhibited at the site to provide education and enjoyment for the general public.

For more information, visit hcea.net. CEG