OSHA

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a compliance directive designed to ensure uniformity in inspection and enforcement procedures when addressing respirable crystalline silica exposures in general industry, maritime, and construction.

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is entitled to "considerable deference" in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a June 11 federal appeals court decision. The ruling assures that the transportation construction industry is free to use proven workplace best practices to protect its workers, according to the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA).

This is the third article covering OSHA's three steps to operator qualification. The first, "OSHA Takes Training to a Higher Level," (Crane Hot Line, June 2019, page 12) covers OSHA's expansion of operator training. The second article, "Misunderstanding Crane Operator Certification," (Crane Hot Line, July 2019, page 12) covers unreasonable expectations regarding operator certification.

The two biggest factors that contribute to crane failures are fluid leakage in the outrigger hydraulic cylinder and ground conditions, or the supporting structure for the outrigger pads. Ensuring that your crane is operating on firm, level and drained ground per OSHA's Cranes & Derricks in Construction rule, starts with a proper inspection of the crane and the job site.

Requiring the federal government to impose a single, emergency standard for coping with COVID-19 is misguided because workers are better protected from the virus by construction industry best practices rather than a rigid "one-size-fits-all" regulation.

Crane operator certification is the second of OSHA'S three steps to operator qualification. By now, most people who use cranes are aware that crane operator certification is firmly established as federal law. That officially occurred on December 10, 2018, but it took more than thirty years to happen.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will hold a teleconference meeting May 12, 2020, in Washington, D.C., to solicit public comments and suggestions on key issues facing OSHA's whistleblower protection program.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued interim guidance to advise compliance safety and health officers to evaluate an employer's good faith efforts to comply with safety and health standards during the coronavirus pandemic.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced an interim enforcement response plan for the coronavirus pandemic on April 14. The response plan provides instructions and guidance to OSHA area offices and compliance safety and health officers (CSHOs) for handling coronavirus-related complaints, referrals and severe illness reports.

Did you know that in 2019, excavation and trenching violations were some of the most-expensive OSHA citations? Among the most dangerous construction-related activities, trenching accidents represented the tenth highest penalty issued by the federal agency last year.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established a revised National Emphasis Program (NEP) to identify and reduce or eliminate worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) in general industry, maritime, and construction.