U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration

President Donald Trump signed into law H.R. 2157 – the "Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019" – on June 6 that provides $19.1 billion to cover recovery and other costsassociated with a series of catastrophic disasters that have struck the United States over the past three years.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao swore in Nicole R. Nason as the 20th Administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation's (USDOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on May 2, 2019. The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly confirmed Nason by a vote of 95-1 on March 28.

During a hearing before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works on Jan. 29, Nicole Nason said that, should the committee confirm her nomination as administrator of the Federal Highway Administration, she plans to place a special focus on rural roadway safety.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials urges the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to approve the nomination of Nicole Nason to be the next Administrator of the Federal Highway Administration. "The Trump Administration made a wise choice with its nomination of Nicole Nason as the next FHWA Administrator.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials filed two policy letters on Jan. 11, the first providing comments on proposed rule on proprietary products issued by the Federal Highway Administration last November and the second commenting on a proposed waiver that would allow deployment of Cellular Vehicle-To-Everything or C-V2X technology in the 5.9 GHz band.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced a final rule Oct. 31, to amend Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that will accelerate project delivery.

Denver will serve as the location for the inaugural meeting on managing the impact of natural and man-made disasters on infrastructure, bringing together transportation leaders from around the country. The Resilience Innovations Summit and Exchange (RISE) will be Oct.

HOUGHTON, Mich. (AP) Michigan is asking the federal government for help paying for repairs to flood-damaged roads in the Upper Peninsula and says road damage is expected to exceed $28.7 million. The Michigan Department of Transportation announced June 26 that it's submitted a notice of intent to the U.S.