It’s a Wrap: NYSDOT Finishes Bridge Rehab on Route 9

Fri September 26, 2008 - Northeast Edition
CEG



New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) Commissioner Astrid C. Glynn was joined Sept. 3 by federal, state and local elected officials at a ceremony celebrating the completion of a $6.5 million project to rehabilitate the state Route 9 bridge over the Crum Elbow Creek in the town of Hyde Park, Dutchess County. The project included preservation of a historic stone wall along the Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site.

“This project is an excellent example of state and federal government working together to improve our transportation system while preserving the past for future generations,” Glynn said. “[This project] reaffirms Governor David A. Patterson’s commitment to safe and efficient transportation, improved mobility and preserving the quality of our communities in this growing region of New York State.”

Joining Glynn were State Senator Stephen M. Saland, State Assemblyman Joel M. Miller, Dutchess County Legislator Diane Nash, town of Hyde Park Supervisor Pompey Delafield, Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site Director Sarah Olson and representatives of federal elected officials. The event was held on the Vanderbilt Mansion property alongside the rehabilitated bridge and reconstructed stone wall.

U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton said, “The Crum Elbow Creek Bridge rehabilitation project is an important step in strengthening our infrastructure and preserving one of our historic landmarks. Due to the hard work and cooperation of the New York State Department of Transportation and the National Park Service, residents of Hyde Park and travelers from around the region will benefit from improved safety and efficiency while enjoying the beauty of Vanderbilt Mansion.”

U.S. Congresswoman Kirsten Gillibrand said, “I congratulate the NYSDOT and the Park Service for working hand in hand to complete the rehabilitation of the Crum Elbow Creek Bridge on time and in such a way as to be mindful of the environment and the integrity of our historic Vanderbilt State Park. This bridge serves as a viable symbol of how a carefully designed roadway can both function as an important artery for businesses and residents and yet support the beauty which keeps visitors returning to Dutchess County.”

“The partnership between NYS Department of Transportation and the National Park Service on this project demonstrates how different levels of government can work together to bring a project such as this to fruition in a cost effective manner,” said Saland.

Town of Hyde Park Supervisor Pompey Delafield said, “Stone and stonework are so much an essential part of Hyde Park’s history. It is gratifying that the Route 9 Bridge, a prominent example of the art of stonework, has been preserved for the next generation and we thank the National Park Service and the New York State Department of Transportation for their role in ensuring this preservation.”

The construction contract was awarded to Sun Up Enterprises of Wappinger Fall, Dutchess County, in March 2007.

Work focused on rehabilitating the Route 9 stone arch bridge over the Crum Elbow Creek and adjoining historic stone walls that define the Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site property. The stone arch bridge was built in the late 1800s and later widened to the east in the 1920s. The project involved stabilizing the failing historic stone walls on each corner approaching the bridge in conjunction with the span’s rehabilitation. Approximately 5,100 sq. ft. (473.8 sq m) of historic stone wall was reconstructed, requiring careful documentation of the wall before it was dismantled and then rebuilding with the original stone to preserve the integrity of the historic site.

The work was completed on schedule and within budget while maintaining one lane of traffic in each direction for the duration of the project, and required no detours. In addition to rehabilitating the bridge and historic walls, the project included drainage, landscaping and signage improvements, paving and enhanced pavement markings.