Mack to Unveil MP10 Engine in Company’s Titan Model

Tue March 11, 2008 - National Edition
CEG



Mack Trucks Inc. introduced the 16-L Mack MP10 engine, a big-block diesel with up to 605 hp (451 kW) and 2,060 ft. lbs. of torque. The MP10 will be available later this year in the Titan by Mack, a new heavy construction and transport truck and tractor.

Mack has a tradition of equipping its trucks with big-block engines going back decades to the RW Super-Liner with its E9-500 power plant. The modern MP10 engine adds the intelligent power management like its siblings, the 11-L MP7 and 13-L MP8 engines. Like the MP7 and MP8, the MP10 is certified to meet the U.S. ’07 emissions standards, using ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and a diesel particulate filter. All of Mack’s MP engines come with the next generation of Mack’s Vehicle Management and Control System, V-MAC IV.

“The MP10 offers a perfect balance between low-end power and high-speed horsepower for sever service applications like logging and mining, where drivers are carrying extreme gross combination weights,” said David McKenna, Mack powertrain sales and marketing manager. “It has a ’hump’ horsepower curve, which means it has more power at 1,500 rpm than it does at 1,850 rpm. This encourages drivers to operate at lower rpm with greater power for greater fuel efficiency.”

This single overhead cam engine can generate peak power of 515, 565 and 605 hp (384, 421 and 451 kW) in its MaxiCruise configuration. Maximum torque ranges from 1,860 to 2,060 ft. lbs. at 1,200 rpm. A Maxidyne configuration will be released later. This massive torque gives the MP10 the ability to pull heavy loads from a dead stop and the power to get them up to speed on the highway. That makes it appealing to loggers, miners, equipment haulers and anyone who needs big muscle.

“In some areas, an operator running a log train is going to need low-end power to move maybe 250,000 lbs. gross combination weight [GCW] out of a logging camp to the lumber mill,” McKenna said.

“You need the incredible low-end torque of the MP10 to move that massive load over basic logging roads and still maintain an adequate vehicle speed. And once that same truck reaches the highway, it can then deliver a 140,000-lb. highway-legal load from the lumber mill to the retailer. At that point the MP10 delivers the higher horsepower needed for highway speeds.”

According to McKenna, the MP10 is a modern engineering marvel. With approximately 38 hp (28 kW) per liter, the engine hits the sweet spot of being sized correctly for brute power while still being optimized for all-important fuel efficiency. For all its power, the MP10 also is a very quiet engine with a harmonically balanced camshaft and insulated engine mounts to reduce noise, vibration and harshness.

“This is the art of modern diesel engines,” McKenna said. “You get all of the components and subsystems to work in concert with each other. You manage the ways the fuel management and air management systems interact with each other to optimize power at every engine rpm step.”