U.S. Construction Spending Up 1.5 Percent in January

U.S. construction spending increased in January by the largest amount in eight months as weakness in homebuilding was offset by a solid rebound in nonresidential activity.

Tue March 08, 2016 - National Edition
Martin Crutsinger - AP ECONOMICS WRITER


U.S. construction spending increased in January by the largest amount in eight months as weakness in homebuilding was offset by a solid rebound in nonresidential activity.
U.S. construction spending increased in January by the largest amount in eight months as weakness in homebuilding was offset by a solid rebound in nonresidential activity.

WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. construction spending increased in January by the largest amount in eight months as weakness in homebuilding was offset by a solid rebound in nonresidential activity.

Construction spending increased 1.5 percent in January, the biggest gain since May, following a 0.6 percent increase in December, the Commerce Department reported. The advance pushed total spending to a seasonally adjusted $1.14 trillion in January, the highest level in more than eight years.

Economists are optimistic that construction will continue to show solid gains this year, helping to boost overall economic growth.

For January, home building activity showed no gain, but spending on nonresidential projects rose 1 percent following two months of declines. Spending on government projects increased 4.5 percent with state, local and federal spending both showing gains.

The flat reading for residential construction reflected a slight 0.2 percent drop in single-family construction and a 2.6 percent increase in the smaller apartment sector.

The gain in nonresidential building was led by a 6.7 percent jump in construction of hotels and motels. Spending on office buildings was up but spending in the category that covers shopping centers fell.

Spending on state and local government projects rose 4.4 percent while spending on federal building projects increased an even bigger 5.8 percent.

The January increase in activity was bigger than economists had expected and the government also revised up December figures to show a stronger gain of 0.6 percent, rather than the initial tiny 0.1 percent rise.

Construction activity for all of 2015 showed a 10.5 percent increase to $1.1 trillion, the highest annual level for spending since 2007.

A home construction boom peaked in 2006 before falling for the next five years. Construction spending has been climbing since 2012. Economists expect building activity, fueled by home construction, will bolster overall economic growth in 2016.


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