Crews Make Progress on San Francisco's St. Luke's Hospital

A $329 million project to replace San Francisco’s St. Luke’s Hospital with a modern, better-equipped facility is under way.

📅   Wed April 13, 2016 - West Edition
Chuck Harvey - CEG CORRESPONDENT


A $329 million project to replace San Francisco’s St. Luke’s Hospital with a modern, better-equipped facility is under way.
A $329 million project to replace San Francisco’s St. Luke’s Hospital with a modern, better-equipped facility is under way.
A $329 million project to replace San Francisco’s St. Luke’s Hospital with a modern, better-equipped facility is under way. The new structure is being built adjacent to the old hospital on Cesar Chavez and Guerrero Streets. The replacement hospital will provide inpatient care, diagnostics and treatment, urgent care and intensive care. Approximately 11,000 cu. yds. (8,410 cu m) of concrete and 2,400 tons (2,177 t) of structural steel are being used in constructing the replacement hospital. Work began in September 2014 on a project that will create a new seven-story, 120-bed facility that is designed to be seismically safe. Brian Haux, SkyHawk Photography photo.
The hospital replacement project includes a construction management plan to help provide safety and limit noise levels during construction.
Brian Haux, SkyHawk Photography photo.
The project utilizes more than 10 different software applications allowing for inspection tracking, distribution of plans and 3D model information to computer tablets in the field.
Brian Haux, SkyHawk Photography photo.
Structural steel installation was completed in December 2015. All below-grade concrete walls are complete.

A $329 million project to replace San Francisco's St. Luke's Hospital with a modern, better-equipped facility is under way. The new structure is being built adjacent to the old hospital on Cesar Chavez and Guerrero Streets. St. Luke's is part of the California Pacific Medical Center system,

Once the new hospital opens, the existing hospital will be demolished. A new medical office building will be constructed where the current hospital now stands.

The replacement hospital will provide inpatient care, diagnostics and treatment, urgent care and intensive care. It will meet LEED goals for energy efficiency and sustainable building practices.

Work began in September 2014 on a project that will create a new seven-story, 120-bed facility that is designed to be seismically safe. Substantial completion is scheduled for the second quarter of 2018 and the hospital should start accepting patients in 2019. The hospital will incorporate 100 percent filtering of outside air to keep air fresh and clean for patients.

General contracting is being conducted by a partnership of Herrero Builders of San Francisco and The Boldt Company based in Appleton, Wis. Referred to as HerreroBoldt, the general contractor partnership is replacing the current hospital with an acute care facility.

Numerous trade specialists are on the job each day.

“We currently have more than 50 subcontractors, vendors and consultants working on the project daily,” said Paul Klemish, project director with HerreroBoldt Partners.

In regard to construction crews, about 100 union construction workers are on the day shift. So far there have been no problems that have caused delays or additional money, Klemish said.

Construction is well along. Structural steel installation was completed in December 2015. All below-grade concrete walls are complete.

Workers are currently pouring concrete decks. That work is slated for completion in March of this year.

Work on the interiors will be done through 2016, followed by training, stocking and licensing for the new operations.

The hospital includes a 215,000-sq.-ft. (19,974 sq m) acute healthcare facility.

Typical construction hours are from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.

Substantial Use of Concrete, Steel

Approximately 11,000 cu. yds. (8,410 cu m) of concrete and 2,400 tons (2,177 t) of structural steel are being used in constructing the replacement hospital, Klemish said.

Structural steel is used to improve stability.

“The structural steel system utilizes buckling restrained braces to absorb the lateral energy of an earthquake,” Klemish added.

The project has an established integrated delivery project team that includes HerreroBoldt; Boulder Associates of Boulder, Colo.; Smith Group JJR with multiple locations including San Francisco; and Sutter Health based in Sacramento.

The integrated project delivery team identifies, develops and implements innovative strategies to the design and construction by reducing the project budget to meet the target cost.

About 1,500 trades' workers are employed for the project.

Pankow, with multiple locations including San Francisco and Oakland, is the subcontractor for concrete work. Alamillo Rebar in Villejo, Calif., is in charge of rebar work.

New Technologies Being Used

The project leverages new technologies in the project design, coordination and construction process.

All systems in the hospital are designed in industry-specific 3D software including Revit, 3D AutoCad and Tekla. The initial design is then fully coordinated by the general contractor and trade contractors prior to manufacturing and construction installation.

The project utilizes more than 10 different software applications allowing for inspection tracking, distribution of plans and 3D model information to computer tablets in the field.

Management Plan to Provide Safety During Construction

The hospital replacement project includes a construction management plan to help provide safety and limit noise levels during construction.

The plan provides for 24-hour security, fencing around the new hospital site, daily cleanup of debris in service ways and streets, implementation of a site safety and health plan and noise and vibration management and monitoring.

Also, HerreroBoldt plans transparent communication with neighbors, community leaders and city hall officials as the project proceeds. It provides notifications of meetings and project milestones as well as weekly and six-week construction bulletins.

For instance, the general contractor reported that installation of concrete walls takes place from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

“The hospital is being built between the property lines of an existing hospital campus and adjacent residential neighbors,” Klemish said. “Logistically it is a very tight construction site with effective access on just one side of the site.

Positive Impacts

The new hospital will provide sustainable and efficient healthcare to the surrounding community, Klemish said.

A public plaza will connect the new hospital with the existing campus and will include drought-resistant vegetation and a storm water management system that enables the use of captured water for irrigation.

Safety and usefulness during and after an earthquake are considered vital.

“The hospital is designed to be operational following a strong earthquake to provide healthcare when patients need it most,” Klemish said.