GUCA Members Unite for Old Town Village Project in Conyers

Thu November 23, 2006 - Southeast Edition
Kate Zanoni



The Georgia Utility Contractors Association Inc. (GUCA) teamed up with Habitat for Humanity to build the Old Town Village, a community of 32 homes on 11 acres off Lakeview Drive in Conyers, Ga.

This marks the first time GUCA has undertaken a Habitat for Humanity project.

Once complete, the Old Town Village will be the largest Habitat for Humanity project in the state of Georgia.

Habitat for Humanity largely relies on volunteers to donate materials and labor to complete housing projects. The non-profit organization usually spends approximately $40,000 to complete each house.

In addition to partnering with GUCA, Habitat for Humanity also has teamed up with local churches — including St. Pius X Catholic Church, Epiphany Lutheran Church and Trinity Baptist Church — to gain sponsorship and grants for the subdivision project.

Bill Schroeder, a GUCA member of Protective Liner Systems Inc. and a volunteer of the Habitat Interfaith Consortium-Rockdale County — part of the International Habitat for Humanity program — brought the Old Town Village project before the GUCA Community Service Committee.

“The committee felt that it was an excellent program and then began working on [it],” said GUCA Spokesman Scott Brumbelow.

As a result, Schroeder was appointed GUCA’s coordinator of the Old Town Village Project.

GUCA members have already donated materials to the cause and will be performing all of the underground infrastructure work. They began clearing the undeveloped site in October. Completion of water and sewer installations is expected by the end of November. Once all the utilities have been installed, housing construction will begin in early 2007.

The following GUCA member companies have donated time, labor and materials to the Old Town Village project:

• Advanced Clearing Concepts LLC — grubbing and grinding;

• Cherokee Petroleum Co. — 500 gal. of diesel fuel;

• EFS Inc. — installation of silt fence and tree save fence;

• Foley Products Inc. — concrete pipe at cost;

• Home Depot Waterworks — ductile iron pipe and all fittings;

• Paul Jones & Co. Inc. — air and mandrill testing, tv inspection;

• Premier Utilities & Services Inc. — miscellaneous sewer parts;

• Richard Harp Excavation Inc. — installation of storm and sewer pipes;

• Rockdale Pipeline Inc. — installation of potable water lines;

• Southeast Culvert — HDPE piping at resin cost;

• Southeast Clearing Systems LLC — clearing of right of way boundaries;

• John D. Stevens Inc. — installation of storm pipes;

• Jason Stanton — tree cutting and removal;

• Strack Inc. — concrete pipe, hauling of stone;

• Triton Industries LLC — grading of site;

• United Rental Trench Safety — silt fence, tree save fence, geo-textile; and

• Vulcan Materials Co. — crushed stone for construction exit.

“Habitat for Humanity-Rockdale County has had a long history of helping those in need and this is a monumental event that will change lives forever,” Schroeder said.

Habitat for Humanity plans to construct approximately five houses per year, rendering a tentative 2012 completion date for all 32 homes. CEG