Komatsu's New WA475-10 Wheel Loader Increases Fuel Efficiency By Up To 30 Percent

Tue March 10, 2020 - National Edition
Komatsu

Its engine has 22 more horsepower than the WA470-8 model, but due to the Komatsu hydraulic mechanical transmission (KHMT), it achieves up to a 30 percent increase in fuel efficiency.
Its engine has 22 more horsepower than the WA470-8 model, but due to the Komatsu hydraulic mechanical transmission (KHMT), it achieves up to a 30 percent increase in fuel efficiency.



Extensive customer feedback and years of testing went into the design of Komatsu's versatile new WA475-10 wheel loader, introduced at ConExpo-Con/AGG 2020. Ideal for quarry, waste, infrastructure, forestry and non-residential construction applications, the newly designed WA475-10 with next-generation technology, is on display in Komatsu's booth N-10825.

This new machine was developed to support customers' needs for improved productivity and lower fuel costs. Its engine has 22 more horsepower than the WA470-8 model, but due to the Komatsu hydraulic mechanical transmission (KHMT), it achieves up to a 30 percent increase in fuel efficiency.* KHMT dynamic braking also reduces brake wear for extended component life.

The wheel loader's independent work equipment control simplifies operation and reduces fuel consumption by separating the accelerator pedal from the speed of the work equipment. Incorporating feedback from the field, the improved operating environment includes floor-to-ceiling glass, ergonomically designed switch layouts, and a fully-adjustable 5-axis console for enhanced operator comfort.

To boost productivity, the boom lift force of the WA475-10 is increased by 20 percent, and break out force is improved by 8 percent. The new bucket design improves pile penetration, making it easier to fill and improves material retention in load and carry applications, according to the manufacturer.

The machine's auto hill holding function enables the WA475-10 to remain stationary on a slope without using the brakes. So, even if the operator doesn't apply the brake pedal, the machine won't roll back on uphill applications such as stockpiling operations, thereby reducing service brake wear and enhancing operation.