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Local Business Owner Turns Quarry into Event Space

Mon July 30, 2018 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


Beyette has been working on the site with his own crew and equipment to clear surrounding trees and create a space where audiences can sit and enjoy music while taking in the beauty of the marble rock face, which will serve as a natural backdrop and centerpiece of the amphitheater. (Photo Credit: the Rutland Herald)
Beyette has been working on the site with his own crew and equipment to clear surrounding trees and create a space where audiences can sit and enjoy music while taking in the beauty of the marble rock face, which will serve as a natural backdrop and centerpiece of the amphitheater. (Photo Credit: the Rutland Herald)

An old Vermont quarry will soon be repurposed into a space for local music.

The five-acre quarry, located in Proctor, Vt., was bought by Frank and Karen Beyette in 2015, whose restaurant sits across the street from the site, the Rutland Herald reported. According to Frank, the scenic water and rock in the quarry, plus the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado inspired him to create a live music venue.

“It's a good sister project for the restaurant, and we can cater right from here,” he told the Rutland Herald. “There aren't many reasons to come to Proctor. We want to put Proctor back on the map.”

Not to mention the site's natural beauty.

“It's picturesque as heck,” said Beyette. “I just wanted it for the backdrop.”

A Work in Progress

Beyette has been working on the site with his own crew and equipment to clear surrounding trees and create a space where audiences can sit and enjoy music while taking in the beauty of the marble rock face, which will serve as a natural backdrop and centerpiece of the amphitheater.

When complete, “The Quarry” will have removable walls, a 30-by-40-ft. pavilion, bathrooms, a sewer system, a cooking space, a fence along the edge of the old quarry and enough room to seat 775 people, Beyette said.

Construction is expected to be complete by summer 2019, but for now, Beyette is focused on getting his Act 250 permit approved by the fall, the Rutland Herald reported.

“If the snow's gone by April, I'll start digging,” he said.




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