Plans for Tacoma Methanol Plant Cancelled

The company considering developing a methanol plant on the former Kaiser smelter site in Tacoma has decided to cancel the project.

📅   Wed April 20, 2016 - West Edition


The company considering developing a methanol plant on the former Kaiser smelter site in Tacoma has decided to cancel the project.
The company considering developing a methanol plant on the former Kaiser smelter site in Tacoma has decided to cancel the project.

Washington State news affiliate King5 is reporting that the company considering developing a methanol plant on the former Kaiser smelter site in Tacoma has decided to cancel the project.

Northwest Innovation Works said after 24 months of studying, they've decided to exercise the option to terminate their lease of the Port of Tacoma location, effective immediately.

The decision comes after much public outcry by area residents concerned about the project's safety and environmental impact.

Dennis Callies, a skilled laborer in Tacoma, is disappointed with the news.

"We hope that this doesn't discourage other industries from moving into Pierce County. Tacoma need jobs," he said.

The proposed plant was projected to bring about 1,000 construction jobs and 200 permanent jobs to Tacoma.

But residents like Sherry Brockwinkle were concerned about the environmental impact of the plant.

“No community should have a plant like this poisoning our air and our water. Taking all of their water. Should never happen."

And it's not clear if those things would have happened, but according to Northwest Innovation Works, that's part of the reason why the company decided to terminate the lease with the port of Tacoma.

It would have taken years to answer the critical environmental concerns about site regulation and land mitigation.

"People don't want a polluted industrial future for our economy and for our city," said Deputy Mayor Ryan Mello.

Mello says the city needs to clarify what kind of industries should come to Tacoma.

"We really need to look forward to the kind of economy the quality of jobs that impact those jobs have on our environment so we have work to do with the port to define our economic vision for the port of Tacoma."

In the meantime, those like Dennis Callies hope the news won't further discourage those skilled labors who are already facing a bleak job market.

"My family lives here my members family lives here and we don't want stuff dumping in our sound or stuff dumping in our atmosphere. We wanted it to be safe but we're disappointed they're not going to let the process finished. “

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