Staker Parson Revitalizes Diesel Technician Workforce

Tue January 15, 2019 - West Edition #2
Staker Parson Materials & Construction


Staker Parson Materials & Construction attended the fourth meeting with the committee to implement the Utah Diesel Technician Pathways (UDTP) Program.
(Staker Parson Materials & Construction photo)
Staker Parson Materials & Construction attended the fourth meeting with the committee to implement the Utah Diesel Technician Pathways (UDTP) Program. (Staker Parson Materials & Construction photo)

Staker Parson Materials & Construction attended the fourth meeting with the committee to implement the Utah Diesel Technician Pathways (UDTP) Program in northern Utah. Industry leaders (such as Komatsu, Cat, Freightliner, Cummins Engines, Volvo and more), the Utah Transit Authority (UTA), and school board members for the surrounding areas, met at the Davis Technical College to plan their next steps in their rollout of the UDTP program. This program offers high school students the opportunity to complete college courses in diesel mechanics, working alongside industry professionals, while offering courses at a fraction of the cost.

Scott King, instructor at Davis Technical College, said, "The largest driving factor that has really sparked the interest of students in the industry has been the involvement of companies within the industry. The increases in starting pay wages that all of the big employers have been making available for entry-level technicians, that we have high-quality students completing our program."

"Almost since the inception of the UDTP program, Joe [Allen], northern equipment manager for Staker Parson Materials & Construction, has been a major part of the program and he's been integral in getting everyone excited to be here. It's been a real blessing to have someone involved that has the same enthusiasm as we do," Mark Hadley, Davis Technical College director of technical and apprenticeship programs said.

"I think if you're looking to make a decent living, and you're good with your hands, you can not only make money, but you can save money. I put four kids through college turning wrenches. I know how hard it is to get great employees. This program will help by getting dedicated, hardworking people, at a young age employed, with a degree under their belt and a solid career ahead of them," Allen said.

The Utah Diesel Technician Pathways plans to announce the program in early 2019 with the goal to offer the program in schools in April of 2019.

For more information, visit dieselpathways.com or facebook.com/utahdieseltech.