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What It's Like to Work High Above the Frigid Hudson

High winds can be a problem. Also weather conditions such as snow and ice can make footing treacherous.

Wed January 13, 2016 - Northeast Edition
Construction Equipment Guide


The New York Times is reporting that 5,000 workers have so far taken part of the building the twin-span replacement for the 61-year-old bridge, and most of those workers are doing their jobs at dizzying heights.
The New York Times is reporting that 5,000 workers have so far taken part of the building the twin-span replacement for the 61-year-old bridge, and most of those workers are doing their jobs at dizzying heights.

The New York Times is reporting that 5,000 workers have so far taken part of the building the twin-span replacement for the 61-year-old bridge, and most of those workers are doing their jobs at dizzying heights.

Workers must often walk along steel beams just two feet wide that are placed six stories above the cold waters of the Hudson River.

High winds can be a problem. Also weather conditions such as snow and ice can make footing treacherous. Three workers died working on the Verrazano.

Yet the workers maintain a strong morale, working on an incredibly large piece of infrastructure that they can point to for decades to come.

For the full story, click here.




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