Working Outside May Eventually Prove Dangerous

White House Science Advisor John Holdren says because of the impacts of climate change construction and agricultural workers “will basically be unable to control their body temperature and will die.”

Wed April 06, 2016 - National Edition
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The White House live-streamed the announcement of the release of the Obama Administration's “The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment.”
The White House live-streamed the announcement of the release of the Obama Administration's “The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment.”

CBS News is reporting that White House Science Advisor John Holdren says because of the impacts of climate change, construction and agricultural workers “will basically be unable to control their body temperature and will die.”

“In some parts of the world, when you look more broadly at this question, you see the likelihood that in the hottest times of the year it will be simply physiologically impossible to work outdoors,” Holdren said at a White House event on climate change Monday.

“That means construction, that means agriculture, people who try to work outdoors will basically be unable to control their body temperature and will die. This is a really, really big deal. And it's going to be a big deal in the hottest parts of the United States as well as the Middle East, in South Asia and other places.”

The White House live-streamed the announcement of the release of the Obama Administration's “The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment.”

“The report projects that under middle-of-the-road emissions scenarios we could see from thousands to tens of thousands additional heat related deaths in the United States each summer,” Holdren said.

The White House says the report was developed “by approximately one hundred experts in climate-change science and public health – including representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Agriculture (USDA), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Department of Defense (DOD), and the Department of Veteran's Affairs (VA).”

To read the full article, click here.


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