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Concrete Salvaged From Wildfire Damaged Repurposed For New Roads

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers believes there will be about one million tons of waste removed from such sites, with concrete, metal and wood set aside to be recycled.

Mon December 18, 2017 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


According to Mark Soiland, president of Soiland Co., the company that owns the quarry, the facility has been accepting around 300 loads of concrete each day from crews working on home sites managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).
According to Mark Soiland, president of Soiland Co., the company that owns the quarry, the facility has been accepting around 300 loads of concrete each day from crews working on home sites managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Burned concrete salvaged from the recent fires in Sonoma County, Calif., is being repurposed to create new roads. Dump trucks are in the process of delivering the damaged concrete to the Stony Point Rock Quarry, where it will be crushed and recycled, Aggregates Manager reported.

According to Mark Soiland, president of Soiland Co., the company that owns the quarry, the facility has been accepting around 300 loads of concrete each day from crews working on home sites managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The USACE believes there will be about one million tons of waste removed from such sites, with concrete, metal and wood set aside to be recycled, Aggregates Manager reported.

After the rebar is removed from the concrete, it will be crushed into ¾-in. pieces to be sold as a road base.

“We flew a drone over it recently and estimate that we have 41,000 tons in here,” Soiland told Aggregates Manager. According to Soiland, that's about a three-year supply.




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