Sell Your Equipment  /  Dealer Login  /  Create Account

Crews Work to Rebuild Sand Dunes After Hurricane

The plan calls for 60,000 cu. yds. of sand to be trucked in from the Little River area. The work should be finished by March 1.

Fri December 15, 2017 - National Edition
The Associated Press


“The dunes were largely destroyed and totaled by Hurricane Matthew. He dealt the death blow, but prior storms had eaten away at those dunes,” said Pat Dowling, a spokesman of the city of North Myrtle Beach.
“The dunes were largely destroyed and totaled by Hurricane Matthew. He dealt the death blow, but prior storms had eaten away at those dunes,” said Pat Dowling, a spokesman of the city of North Myrtle Beach.

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) Work has started on rebuilding sand dunes at a South Carolina beach damaged by Hurricane Matthew last year.

Trucks filled with sand started rolling into North Myrtle Beach under the project expected to take about three months, The Sun News of Myrtle Beach reported.

“The dunes were largely destroyed and totaled by Hurricane Matthew. He dealt the death blow, but prior storms had eaten away at those dunes,” said Pat Dowling, a spokesman of the city of North Myrtle Beach.

The plan calls for 60,000 cu. yds. of sand to be trucked in from the Little River area. The work should be finished by March 1.

Between five and 15 dump trucks will work each day hauling sand, which will be bulldozed into place. Because of the small number of trucks being used in the effort, there are not expected to be any traffic impacts.

Parts of the beach will be closed temporarily during the work.

“As far as blocking beach lots, there won't be the degree that it was during renourishment,” Dowling said.

The Army Corps of Engineers conducted a nearly $11 million beach nourishment project in October.

The city is paying $616,000 to get the dunes rebuilt to protect ocean-front buildings from storm surges, Dowling said. The new dune berm will be about 7 ft. high and about 35 ft. wide.

There should be no problem with lights and night work, Dowling said.

“It's a probability there won't be a lot of night work, unless they get behind the eight-ball and they have to,' he said.




Today's top stories

Contractors Solve Logistical Challenges On Coastal Project

Integration of Topcon 3D-MC With Volvo Active Control Raises Bar in Excavation Precision

NCDOT Calls On Lane Construction to Improve I-440 With $365M Project

Thousands of John Deere Workers Strike After Union Rejects Contract

Hitachi Introduces ZW100-6 Wheel Loader in North America

Construction Begins on Journal Squared's 60-Story Tower 3 in Jersey City

Proposed Rollback of NEPA Reforms Conflicts With Biden's Infrastructure Goals

Stokes to Become Idaho Transportation Director in 2022


 






ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo