Massachusetts Recycling Business Credits Team for Sustained Growth

Thu February 13, 2020 - Northeast Edition #4
C.N. Wood

An operator uses a Fuchs MHL350 at Allied Recycling Center to sort through a pile of material. “We chose the 350 because it has the right reach for the yard,” President Eddie Jamieson said. “The arm can extend 50 ft., and the cab has a continuously variable viewing height of up to 18 ft., which gives the operator a bird’s-eye view of the yard.”
An operator uses a Fuchs MHL350 at Allied Recycling Center to sort through a pile of material. “We chose the 350 because it has the right reach for the yard,” President Eddie Jamieson said. “The arm can extend 50 ft., and the cab has a continuously variable viewing height of up to 18 ft., which gives the operator a bird’s-eye view of the yard.”
An operator uses a Fuchs MHL350 at Allied Recycling Center to sort through a pile of material. “We chose the 350 because it has the right reach for the yard,” President Eddie Jamieson said. “The arm can extend 50 ft., and the cab has a continuously variable viewing height of up to 18 ft., which gives the operator a bird’s-eye view of the yard.” Allied Recycling Center in Walpole, Mass., relies on its Fuchs MHL320 material handler to take on a wide range of scrap metal. “We put it in the non-ferrous zone and use a sorting grapple to separate things like aluminum, copper, wire and stainless steel,” explained President Eddie Jamieson. “The grapple feels like an extension of the operator’s hand and allows for greater precision when grabbing, picking and sorting through different pieces.”


Eddie Jamieson grew up sorting and handling scrap metals in his family's business. When he realized the family pyramid was growing too wide at the base and there was limited room for growth within the company, he decided to take a chance and venture out on his own. In 2004, he connected with his current business partner, Eddie Sciaba, and the two opened Allied Recycling in Walpole, Mass.

"We bought a yard that had permits but hadn't been running for a while," continued Jamieson. "We had to go through the property and clean it all up. It took some time before we got everything right and started the business."

The 60-acre facility is divided between a 40-acre parts yard and a 20-acre scrap metal zone. It is one of the largest such facilities in the area. The firm works with customers ranging from people looking for parts to large industrial accounts. Allied Recycling also provides roll-off, trucking and demolition services.

"We get a lot of cars, truck parts, heavy equipment and non-ferrous materials through the facility, which is exported out of the country or stays domestic, depending on who will provide the best value to our customers," explained Jamieson.

After weathering initial growing pains in the early years, the company has now expanded to more than 40 employees. Jamieson recognizes General Manager Michael Sciaba, CFO Matt Starnes and Senior Buyer Kevin Grant as key staff members who have helped the company succeed.

"All of our employees are a strength because when they come here, they seem to stay," offered Jamieson. "When Michael came on board, he was instrumental in helping find new markets that we were unaware of. We have multiple people who have worked at this company since they were teenagers. They are now in their 30s and hold key positions. We've been very lucky so far in that regard."

Fuchs the Right Fit

When the facility opened in 2004, the firm relied on older used equipment. After the first eight years, it began investing in new equipment and partnered with C.N. Wood to purchase Fuchs material handlers. Currently, Allied Recycling utilizes two Fuchs MHL350s and a MHL320 to manage the large amount of material coming through the facility daily.

"The 320 is a little smaller machine," explained Jamieson. "We put that in the non-ferrous zone and use a sorting grapple to separate things like aluminum, copper, wire and stainless steel. The grapple feels like an extension of the operator's hand and allows for greater precision when grabbing, picking and sorting through different pieces. It works a lot better than a regular demolition grapple."

The firm puts one of its Fuchs MHL350s to work full time loading trailers and unloading incoming material, and the other to assist in processing.

"We chose the 350 because it has the right reach for the yard," stated Jamieson. "The arm can extend 50 feet, and the cab has a continuously variable viewing height of up to 18 feet, which gives the operator a bird's-eye view of the yard. The machine is very nimble for its size and is a great match for our production."

Allied Recycling tracks how hard each machine is working with monthly reports on hours, fuel consumption and other statistics that C.N. Wood provides. All three Fuchs machines have an extended warranty through C.N. Wood, a major selling point for Jamieson and Sciaba. The company also relies on its distributor for regular service and maintenance for the machines.

"C.N. Wood has been right there every time we need them," offered Jamieson. "We have very limited issues with the machines, although when something comes up, we never have to wait. They take care of us.

"We're very happy with the Fuchs brand, and coupled with the service we receive from C.N. Wood, have been very pleased through the years," continued Jamieson. "We have a business as well as a personal relationship with the people at C.N. Wood. We don't feel like just another number."

Continued Growth

Year-after-year, Allied Recycling has consistently increased its business and hired more employees. Jamieson envisions that trend continuing into the future and eventually turning the company over to some longtime employees who have been a part of the firm's success.

"The strength of the company is our people," said Jamieson. "I hope that at some point the staff who are putting in the work now will be the ones running and possibly owning the company. They should be rewarded for everything that they have helped build here."

For more information about Allied Recycling Center Inc., send an email to info@arcscrap.com or visit www.arcscrap.com.

(This story was reprinted with permission from C.N. Wood Company's Wood Works Magazine, Jan. 2020 issue.)