University Completes Replica of 11th Century Viking Home

The project has been under construction for the past month, and now that it is complete, it has put UW-Green Bay on the map as one of the only campuses worldwide to boast such a structure.

📅   Mon December 04, 2017 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


Come spring, officials envision using the house as a space for students and community members to participate in classes and projects, such as blacksmithing, carving and “authentic Viking cooking,” ABC 2 reported.
Come spring, officials envision using the house as a space for students and community members to participate in classes and projects, such as blacksmithing, carving and “authentic Viking cooking,” ABC 2 reported.

Construction has wrapped up on a replica of an 11th century Viking house on the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay's campus.

The project has been under construction for the past month, and now that it is complete, it has put UW-Green Bay on the map as one of the only campuses worldwide to boast such a structure, ABC 2 reported.

According to Heidi Sherman, chair of the history program at UW-Green Bay and curator of the house, “There's not a real plan to building a house like this. I mean it's modeled after a 1,000-year-old house, so we weren't quite sure how it was going to go.

“Students today are so far removed from tradition, from working with their hands because we're in a highly digital society. What's really key about this project is we're going to be teaching people how to do things, before there were factories, industrialization. Before there were computers and cell phones.”

“To try and understand the past and past culture, past life, you should try and immerse yourself in it. And how much more immersive can you get than literally going in this house,” said UW-Green Bay student Amber Foster.

Sherman said the house will be a living museum, as well as a hands-on learning experience for students, ABC 2 reported. Come spring, officials envision using the house as a space for students and community members to participate in classes and projects, such as blacksmithing, carving and “authentic Viking cooking,” ABC 2 reported.