Construction Ahead of Schedule on State's First Medical College

The $34 million, 94,000-sq.-ft. project is slated to be complete in May 2018, three weeks ahead of its initial June 12 completion date.

📅   Tue September 26, 2017 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


“At the stage we're at right now, the steel structure is up and we've started framing inside the building,” said Chris Wilson, director of facilities and project manager. Wilson said that crews have also begun to install the building's electrical and HVAC.
“At the stage we're at right now, the steel structure is up and we've started framing inside the building,” said Chris Wilson, director of facilities and project manager. Wilson said that crews have also begun to install the building's electrical and HVAC.

Construction on the Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine (ICOM), Idaho's very first medical school is moving along ahead of schedule and on budget, the Idaho Business Review reported. The $34 million, 94,000-sq.-ft. project is slated to be complete in May 2018, three weeks ahead of its initial June 12 completion date.

“It could not be going better,” said Robert Hasty, founding dean and chief academic officer of ICOM.¬†

According to Hasty, Engineered Structures, Inc., the project's contractor, has agreed to a Construction Manafgement at Risk (CMAR) delivery method. “If they don't finish on time, they give us a refund,” said Hasty.

Making Progress

“At the stage we're at right now, the steel structure is up and we've started framing inside the building,” said Chris Wilson, director of facilities and project manager. Wilson said that crews have also begun to install the building's electrical and HVAC.

Once complete, the facility will include:

  • 24 small group rooms;
  • a simulation lab;
  • 12 exam rooms;
  • areas for students and faculty to socialize;
  • a coffee shop featuring 20-ft. windows;
  • a “mother's room,” and
  • a “spiritual room” auditorium.
  • Although the facility had thought about aiming for a LEED certification, it ultimately decided not to pursue the distinction. According to Hasty, doing so would have made the college less affordable, citing a Forbes article that stated LEED-certified buildings are typically less energy-efficient than their uncertified counterparts, the Idaho Business Review reported.