Denver Plans Will Enhance Mobility

Wed July 19, 2017 - West Edition #15
Construction Equipment Guide


Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock (C) cuts the ribbon on the University of Colorado A-Line on April 22, 2016.
Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock (C) cuts the ribbon on the University of Colorado A-Line on April 22, 2016.
Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock (C) cuts the ribbon on the University of Colorado A-Line on April 22, 2016. 
Mayor Hancock announced a reorganization of Denver Public Works to elevate and better address the city’s growing transportation and mobility needs.
(Denver.org photo)

Mayor Michael B. Hancock announced a reorganization of Denver Public Works to elevate and better address the city's growing transportation and mobility needs. The restructuring will serve as a precursor to the proposed new cabinet-level Department of Transportation and Mobility.

“We all know the challenges we face — worsening congestion and safety and limited mobility options,” Hancock said. “Those challenges impact our economy, environment, health and overall quality of life. Restructuring Denver Public Works to elevate transportation and mobility — now one of the highest priorities for the people of Denver — and then creating a new Department of Transportation and Mobility will advance our ability to move more people, more efficiently and more safely.”

The next Public Works executive director will be responsible for implementing the reorganization by first creating two divisions within the department: a public works division and a mobility division. A candidate review process for the new executive director is currently under way.

The reorganization will consolidate mobility policy and planning, parking, right of way and traffic engineering operations and maintenance under one roof, while the Public Works division will continue to manage solid waste, wastewater, water quality, fleet management and other essential services.

“Increasing mobility options in Denver is of utmost importance and the decision to elevate the city's transportation focus is the right one at the right time,” said Denver City Councilwoman Mary Beth Susman (Dist. 5) who serves on the Mayor's mobility task force. “This move sends a profound message to our community regarding one of their top priorities that the city will be applying concentrated resources for more effective and efficient mobility for our citizens.”

Restructuring DPW in the near-term will allow for a smooth transition to a new Department of Transportation and Mobility and will expedite decision-making and project delivery for Denver residents. Establishing a cabinet-level department with these duties requires an amendment to the Denver city charter, which entails referral by Denver City Council and approval by Denver voters. The decision follows an analysis by Sam Schwartz City Strategies, which examined optimal organizational structures to help city leaders better address Denver's growing transportation and mobility needs.

“The employees at Denver Public Works care deeply about our city and our goal is for this reorganization to enhance their efforts to keep Denver safe, vibrant and moving forward,” Hancock added.

The Mayor's announcement comes as the city prepares to seek voter approval in November for a $900 million General Obligation bond. The largest portion of bond proceeds will fund improvements to Denver's street, bridge, pedestrian and bicycle networks.

For more information, visit denvergov.org.




Today's top stories

Industry Urges Workers to Get COVID Vaccine

Metro Overpass Collapses in Mexico City, Leaving Many Dead, Injured

Five Stand-On Skid Steer Attachments to Invest In

Pegasus Link Constructors Leads $1.7B Project

Doosan Bobcat Helps Professionals Build a Better Tomorrow With Mobile Training Lab

Bobcat Company, Country Artist Justin Moore Announce Partnership, Fan Sweepstakes

Hall County, Ga., the Site of Seven Current or Future Road Projects

VIDEO: Volvo CE Delivers Its Version of the Factory 4 Tomorrow


 






ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo