Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Leads North End Beach Replenishment Work

Thu July 16, 2020 - National Edition #15
Ocean City, N.J.


Designed to rebuild beaches along this stretch, the more than $16 million project is part of a 50-year agreement that calls for a three-year cycle of renourishment projects.
Designed to rebuild beaches along this stretch, the more than $16 million project is part of a 50-year agreement that calls for a three-year cycle of renourishment projects.
Designed to rebuild beaches along this stretch, the more than $16 million project is part of a 50-year agreement that calls for a three-year cycle of renourishment projects. Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company has been awarded the contract by the federal Army Corps of Engineers. A machine called a CRAB — a Coastal Research Amphibious Buggy — helps surveyors measure the beach where the water would be too deep for them to stand.

The Ocean City, N.J., beach is getting a facelift in the form of 1.5 million cu. yds. of new sand along 2.1 mi. of the area's northernmost and downtown beaches, between the terminal groin at Seaview Road and 13th Street.

Designed to rebuild beaches along this stretch, the more than $16 million project is part of a 50-year agreement that calls for a three-year cycle of renourishment projects of which the federal government pays 65 percent, the state 35 percent (with the municipality bearing 25 percent of the state's cost.)

Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company has been awarded the contract by the federal Army Corps of Engineers.

Another replenishment occurred in 2017, with a $13.4 million project to rebuild beaches at the northern end of the island between Seaspray Road and the area beyond 12th Street. This work added about 1.3 million cu. yds. of sand to the beaches and stockpiled even more for the rebuilding of dunes in areas near Fifth Street and 10th Street.

In 2015, the beaches between the "terminal groin" — the northernmost jetty at Seaspray Road — to 12th Street were replenished as part of a $12.3 million project. The Army Corps of Engineers estimated the project would require nearly 1 million cu. yds. of sand, including approximately 40,000 cu. yds. to restore dunes.

The South End beach also has received replenishments in 2015, 2016 and 2020.