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Monroe Tractor Demos Kleemann Impact Crusher in N.Y.

Fri February 25, 2011 - Northeast Edition
CEG


The operator of Monroe Tractor’s Doosan expertly drops chunks of concrete into the Kleemann crusher.
The operator of Monroe Tractor’s Doosan expertly drops chunks of concrete into the Kleemann crusher.
The operator of Monroe Tractor’s Doosan expertly drops chunks of concrete into the Kleemann crusher. The mother and father of Monroe Tractor — still going strong after 60 years in business! Henry and Dorothy Hansen are well recognized in the construction community. When he’s not in Florida, Henry comes to work nearly every day. (L-R): Henry Hansen, the patriarch and founder of Monroe tractor; Janet Felosky, president and Henry’s daughter; Dorothy Hansen; Chris Felosky, Janet’s son and product support manager; and Sandy Alvarez, Henry’s daughter and head of Monr The vintage Case eagle sitting on top of the world in the lobby in Rochester is a reminder of the 60 years that Monroe Tractor has been in business. The usual baseball caps were replaced by ski wear during the two-day event. From chunks to small stone in a matter of minutes. The MR 130 Z EVO is designed for continuous through put. The MR 130 Z EVO presented during the demonstration had about 200 hours on it. Joe Schappert, technical sales manager of Kleemann, said the MR 130 Z EVO produces results in greater volume and at higher speed. (L-R): Mario Lamantia, Mark Kastner, Tony Nasello and Joe Schappert get a good look at the mechanism that separates and removes metal from concrete as part of the crusher operation. Tony Nasello (L) of Tobey Paving in Rochester and his friend Mario Lamantia stayed for several hours to watch the new class of crusher do its thing. Tony Nasello (L) of Tobey Paving in Rochester and his friend Mario Lamantia stayed for several hours to watch the new class of crusher do its thing.

Monroe Tractor held a two-day live demonstration and informative walk-around of the Kleemann MR 130 Z EVO mobile impact crusher Feb. 3 and 4 in West Henrietta, N.Y., near Rochester.

Within minutes, chunks of abandoned concrete were dropped into the hopper while uniformly shaped stone, ready for reuse, were deposited at the other end.

Several loads of rubble, which was quickly reduced to small rocks, came from Midtown Plaza — an epic piece of demolition from the first indoor shopping plaza ever constructed in the United States. Built in the early 1960s and currently being torn down, the Midtown Plaza project is the lynch pin to Rochester’s downtown urban renewal.

Joe Schappert, technical sales manager of Kleemann, said the MR 130 is similar in design to other crushers his company manufactures, but it is wider and has a more powerful drive for increased output. People watching were taken with the mechanism’s forceful magnets that can separate and discard metal of every shape — even rebar — that is buried in a lot of concrete.

Feed capacities of 450 tph and more make this a highly productive unit. An enhanced material flow design ensures that there is no restriction to the pass-through of material throughout the entire operation. In primary screening, the MR 130 can be fitted with a slotted integrated grizzly. A final screening unit is available as an option.

Among the crowd, contractors like Tony Nasello of Tobey Paving in Rochester admired the impact crusher’s performance. The machinery being demoed at Monroe Tractor, with 200 hours on it, is actually three years old.

Lively and informative demonstrations like this one are just part of the celebration of Monroe Tractor’s 60th year of service. The company, with headquarters in Rochester and 10 other locations in Upstate New York is family-owned. The founding mother and father — Henry and Dorothy Hansen — were to hand to meet and greet old friends and to make new ones.

Additional Monroe Tractor locations include: Adams Center, Albany, Auburn, Batavia, Binghamton, Buffalo, Canandaigua, Elmira, Hornell and Syracuse.

During the two-day event, lunch and refreshments provided sustenance to attendees on a cold winter’s day.