Op-Ed: The Dangers of Criminalizing Construction Accidents

Could a criminal conviction in New York City have a grave impact on the construction industry as a whole?

Thu July 21, 2016 - Northeast Edition
Construction Equipment Guide


In a case involving Harco Construction this month, much emphasis was placed on the conduct of the contractor.
In a case involving Harco Construction this month, much emphasis was placed on the conduct of the contractor.

Could a criminal conviction in New York City have a grave impact on the construction industry as a whole? Attorney Brad Gerstman, writing an op-ed for the website Crain's New York Business, believes the answer is “Yes.” In a case involving Harco Construction this month, much emphasis was placed on the conduct of the contractor, but whether or not Harco was a “bad actor,” the criminalization of construction accidents will have a profound effect on all contractors and subcontractors regardless of their history or character.

Read the full article at Crain's New York Business.




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