OSHA Issues Final Rule on Crane Operator Certification Requirements

Thu November 08, 2018 - National Edition
OSHA


Under the final rule, employers are required to train operators as needed to perform assigned crane activities, evaluate them and document successful completion of the evaluations.
Under the final rule, employers are required to train operators as needed to perform assigned crane activities, evaluate them and document successful completion of the evaluations.

OSHA has published a final rule that clarifies certification requirements for crane operators, and maintains the employer's duty to ensure that crane operators can safely operate the equipment. The final rule will maintain safety and health protections for workers while reducing compliance burdens.

Under the final rule, employers are required to train operators as needed to perform assigned crane activities, evaluate them and document successful completion of the evaluations. Employers who have evaluated operators prior to December 9, 2018, will not have to conduct those evaluations again, but will only have to document when those evaluations were completed.

The rule also requires crane operators to be certified or licensed and receive ongoing training as necessary to operate new equipment. Operators can be certified based on the crane's type and capacity, or type only, which ensures that more accredited testing organizations are eligible to meet OSHA's certification program requirements. The final rule revises a 2010 requirement that crane operator certification must specify the rated lifting capacity of cranes for which the operator is certified. Compliant certifications that were already issued by type and capacity are still acceptable under this final rule.

The final rule, with the exception of the evaluation and documentation requirements, will become effective on Dec. 9, 2018. The evaluation and documentation requirements will become effective on February 7, 2019.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to help ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and providing training, education and assistance.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.




Today's top stories

Filling the Labor Pool — Post-Pandemic, Construction Industry Wants Workers to Jump in

Reed & Reed Leads Twin Bridges in Vermont to Mid-Summer Completion

Granite Construction, Mahaffey Drilling Fix Railroad Issue in Encintas

Texas Women in Construction — Sherry McGee: HOLT CAT

OSHA COVID Safety Rules Give Workplace Flexibility to Transportation Construction Firms

Spanning the Potomac: Three-Quarter-Billion-Dollar Bridge Replacement Under Way

Reconstruction Begins On Century-Old Border Crossing Span Over St. John River

Doosan, Trimble Announce Factory-Installed Machine Control Solution for Crawler Excavators


 






ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo ceg-logo