New Cat D6 Debuts World's First High Drive Electric Drive Dozer

Keep Up To Date with Thousands of Other Readers.

Our newsletters cover the entire industry and only include the interests that you pick. Sign up and see.

Submit Email
No, Thank You.

Ransome CAT Aids Habitat for Humanity With Donation

Wed July 27, 2005 - Northeast Edition
CEG



Renting construction equipment can be a major investment even for the most profitable contractors. But for non-profit organizations such as Habitat for Humanity, investing in much needed heavy equipment is not even an option; rather when it comes time to expand or update its fleet, the organization mostly relies on the generosity of others.

The Bucks County, PA, chapter of Habitat for Humanity is primarily funded through donations from local businesses, organizations and individuals so that volunteers can build affordable homes for families in need.

One such local business, Ransome CAT, of Bensalem, PA, recently donated heavy equipment to the non-profit group that helped to greatly reduce the construction costs of a new housing subdivision.

Joseph J. Morrison Jr., Bucks County Habitat’s deputy director of administration and finance, said that his organization had been trying to create a partnership with Ransome CAT for the past year.

After members of Habitat met with Ransome CAT’s community relations manager to discuss a possible donation, the Caterpillar dealer agreed to contribute three machines to the cause — a D4 dozer, a 236 skid steer and a vibratory plate compactor.

According to Michael Fallon, Habitat’s deputy director of construction, the Habitat staff used the Cat machines for a one-month period as they finished grading work and filling in stone around the houses’ foundations in phase one and phase two of the construction.

Fallon said that he was impressed by Ransome CAT’s service, as well as the company’s generosity.

“[Ransome CAT] handled the delivery and pick-up of all three machines. After our meeting, the equipment was delivered to our site the next day. When we were finished, they came and picked [the machines] up,” said Fallon.

He added that this donation helped Habitat save more than $5,000 per week in rental fees.