It's No Secret: Amazon to Announce New HQ2 Location(s)

Keep Up To Date with Thousands of Other Readers.

Our newsletters cover the entire industry and only include the interests that you pick. Sign up and see.

Submit Email
No, Thank You.

Construction Workers Find Collection of Buried Explosives on Site

According to officials, the codes on the explosives indicate that they were made in the 1960s during the Vietnam War.

Tue January 09, 2018 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


The crew found 80 M112 blocks of C4 military explosives, nine M18A1 Claymore anti-personnel mines with firing devices and one roll of military detonating cord in six PVC pipes Oct. 25 when a dozer hit a cylinder, the Daily Miner reported.
The crew found 80 M112 blocks of C4 military explosives, nine M18A1 Claymore anti-personnel mines with firing devices and one roll of military detonating cord in six PVC pipes Oct. 25 when a dozer hit a cylinder, the Daily Miner reported.

Construction crews uncovered a large amount of stolen military explosives while clearing land on a residential property for a horse corral in Pine, Ariz., in October. Now, the government is asking for help from the public to find out who buried the stash, the Daily Miner reported.

The crew found 80 M112 blocks of C4 military explosives, nine M18A1 Claymore anti-personnel mines with firing devices and one roll of military detonating cord in six PVC pipes Oct. 25 when a dozer hit a cylinder, the Daily Miner reported.

According to officials, the codes on the explosives indicate that they were made in the 1960s during the Vietnam War.

“The person or persons responsible obviously took great steps to preserve these items in a remote location and wanted to preserve their condition encasing them in cylinder containers,” said Special Agent Thomas Mangan from the U.S. Department of Justice. “I have been in Arizona since 1987 and this is one of the largest military explosive recoveries that I have seen.” 

With no leads left, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), FBI, Arizona Department of Public Safety and U.S. Army Criminal Investigative Command are asking the public for help. ATF is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for any information that would lead to the arrest and conviction of the individuals who stole the explosives, the Daily Miner reported.

“The ATF, along with our law enforcement partners are committed to ensuring that our communities are safe and that those who violate federal explosive laws are held accountable,” said John Durastanti, special agent in charge for the ATF Phoenix Field Division. “We encourage anyone that might have information regarding the theft of these military explosives or burial of them to come forward and contact law enforcement.”