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CTC Allocates $174.8M to Upgrade State, Local Infrastructure

The projects are expected to repair aging roads and bridges, alleviate traffic delays and support job growth statewide.

Mon February 23, 2015 - West Edition
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The California Transportation Commission (CTC) has allocated $174.8 million to 85 transportation projects that will repair aging roads and bridges, alleviate traffic delays and support job growth statewide. These allocations included nearly $19 million from the Active Transportation Program that will go toward 50 biking and pedestrian projects throughout the state.

“Preserving, rebuilding and expanding the state’s transportation infrastructure is key to improving the state’s mobility for decades to come,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. “Not only is it critical to California’s economy, but investments like these mean a better future for all Californians.”

The newly allocated funding includes $124 million from the State Highway Operation and Protection Program for 24 projects that will preserve and protect the state highway system. These capital improvements include transportation safety projects, pavement repair and preservation work and upgrades to bridges throughout the state.

“At Caltrans, we have a ’fix it first’ mentality, and are continually working to ensure California’s taxpayers are getting the most bang for their buck by targeting dollars where they are most effective — preventative maintenance,” continued Dougherty. “For example, every $1 spent on preventative pavement maintenance saves Californians approximately $10 that would have been spent on expensive pavement repairs.”

The allocations also include $27.1 million from Proposition 1B, a transportation bond approved by voters in 2006. To date, more than $18 billion in Proposition 1B funds have been put to work statewide for transportation purposes. The remaining $4.5 million in allocations came from assorted transportation accounts funded by state and federal dollars.

Notable local projects that received funding allocations are:

Merced County: $2,607,000 — Repair pavement on 20.8 lane miles of State Route 59 (SR-59) in and near Snelling, from north of Oakdale Road to Le Grange Road. The work will improve ride quality and extend the service life along this stretch of highway.

Alpine County: $7,850,000 — Replace pavement on 18 lane miles of SR-88, from the Alpine/Amador County line to Red Lake. The work also will repair areas of the road that have suffered more severe damage, restoring the integrity and extending its service life.

Amador County: $4,312,000 — Replace pavement on 10.2 miles of SR-88, from east of Kays Road to the Amador/Alpine County Line. The work also will repair areas of the road that have suffered more severe damage, restoring the integrity and extending its service life.

San Joaquin County: $550,000 — Perform public outreach, redesign the Stockton Bicycle Network and rewrite the Bicycle Master Plan before submitting it to the Stockton City Council for approval.

The commission also unanimously approved the appointment of Lucy Dunn and Robert Alvarado as its chair and vice chair, respectively, as of March 1, 2015. Each will serve one year in their positions.




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