Iowa Department of Transportation

Crews are well into construction of the second arch of the I-74 Mississippi River Bridge. Construction of the new bridge began in July 2017. The westbound bridge is anticipated to be completed by the end of 2020 and the eastbound bridge in 2021. The new bridge will be more than twice as wide as the existing bridge, providing four lanes in each direction.

The Iowa Transportation Commission approved the Fiscal Year 2021-2025 Iowa Transportation Improvement Program at its meeting on June 9. The program documents investments in Iowa's multimodal transportation system covering aviation, public transit, railroads, trails and highways.

The Iowa Department of Transportation presented the Iowa Transportation Commission with the draft Fiscal Year 2021-2025 Iowa Transportation Improvement Program at its May 12 meeting. The program documents investments in Iowa's multimodal transportation system covering aviation, public transit, railroads, trails and highways.

Another Iowa winter is around the corner. Mid-October signals the official beginning of the winter season for the Iowa Department of Transportation. Using data collected from previous winter events, the Iowa DOT is working to take a proactive approach to help keep everyone moving safely this winter.

A multifaceted, $350 million highway project will give Iowa its first turbine interchange while, according to planners, improving capacity and safety and reducing congestion and delays on a major crossroads for both Iowa and the rest of the nation. "The Interstate 80/380 Interchange is one of the busiest interchanges in the region," said Cathy Cutler, transportation planner for the Iowa Department of Transportation.

A $1.2 billion bridge replacement is currently under way in a cooperative effort between the Iowa and Illinois Departments of Transportation. The I-74 Mississippi River Bridge project is part of an overall plan to improve the I-74 corridor from Moline, Ill., to Davenport, Iowa.

To make its snow plows more visible during blizzard conditions, the Iowa Department of Transportation embarked on legislatively approved pilot project three years ago to add rear facing blue and white lights to the already existing amber-colored lighting systems on about 200 of its snowplows in central Iowa.

On June 12, the Iowa Transportation Commission approved a five-year, $3.4 billion transportation improvement plan that includes $1.8 billion for “modernizing” the Hawkeye state's existing highway system as well as adding “enhanced highway safety features,” according to the Iowa DOT.

Starting July 1, drivers in Iowa are required to change lanes if possible or slow down when they approach any vehicle with flashing lights. All 50 states have versions of this type of law commonly referred to as a “Move Over” law. The laws are meant to protect workers and others who are along the side of the road from being hit by passing motorists.

You've probably heard the phrase, “work smarter, not harder.” For the Iowa Department of Transportation, the use of intelligent transportation system (ITS) tools is making driving through many of its work zones safer for everyone. Last year, 10 people died in crashes in Iowa work zones.

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) Iowa transportation officials plan to make a near-record $779 million in statewide road improvements for the upcoming construction season. The largest project involves widening 40 miles of U.S. Highway 20 in northwest Iowa from two lanes up to four lanes, the Des Moines Register reported.