Tulalip Tribe's $100M Casino May Help Bolster Construction Training

Construction is scheduled to begin later this year, and should be complete either in late 2018 or early 2019.

📅   Thu September 14, 2017 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


The casino will be built over 15 acres of land, where the Tulalip Court, police department and an Arby's currently stand. Both the courthouse and police department will be relocated to a larger facility, and the original casino will be demolished once the new one is completed.
The casino will be built over 15 acres of land, where the Tulalip Court, police department and an Arby's currently stand. Both the courthouse and police department will be relocated to a larger facility, and the original casino will be demolished once the new one is completed.

The Tulalip Tribes will begin construction this September on a $100 million project to replace the Quil Ceda Creek Casino in Marysville, Wash.

The new 110,000-sq.-ft. building, which will sit across the street from the existing casino, will include new dining and entertainment spaces, a gaming floor, a 1,200-stall garage and a new smoke filtration system, HeraldNet reported. The casino will be built over 15 acres of land, where the Tulalip Court, police department and an Arby's currently stand. Both the courthouse and police department will be relocated to a larger facility, and the original casino will be demolished once the new one is completed.

Construction is scheduled to begin later this year, and should be complete either in late 2018 or early 2019.

Giving Back

The tribes have been using money from area casinos and the nearby Quil Ceda Village to fund a cultural center, an early learning center and a health clinic for their community. In addition, the tribes donate millions of dollars every year to charities on and off the reservation, HeraldNet reported.

One cause that is particularly important to Teri Gobin, vice chairwoman for the tribes, is the Tribal Employment Rights Office, which provides training and education to tribal members. A pre-apprenticeship program, accredited through South Seattle College and Renton Technical College trains 50 students each year from any tribe in construction. So far, program members have built 14 tiny houses for Seattle's Low Income Housing Institute, NeraldNet reported. Gobin said she would like the program to expand into solar power manufacturing and repair so members can retrofit tribal buildings with solar power.