Historical Mini and Compact Equipment

Thu December 19, 2019 - National Edition #26
HCEA



Here is a look at a selection of historical mini and compact equipment.

All images were taken at Annual Conventions and Old Equipment Expositions of the Historical Construction Equipment Association.

At one time, Sears Roebuck sold a limited line of construction machinery, and for many years yard and garden tractors have been part of its product line. This is a 1973 Sears SS16 Twin, outfitted with an optional loader, and it’s owned by Ede Hirchak of Hawk Point, Mo.
(HCEA photo)
At one time, Sears Roebuck sold a limited line of construction machinery, and for many years yard and garden tractors have been part of its product line. This is a 1973 Sears SS16 Twin, outfitted with an optional loader, and it’s owned by Ede Hirchak of Hawk Point, Mo. (HCEA photo)

In the 1920s and early 1930s, a surprising range of construction machinery was built upon the chassis of gasoline-powered industrial wheel tractors. This Austin Pup, a small three-wheel roller, is built around a Fordson tractor. Evan Gooch of Columbia, Tenn., is the owner.
(HCEA photo)
In the 1920s and early 1930s, a surprising range of construction machinery was built upon the chassis of gasoline-powered industrial wheel tractors. This Austin Pup, a small three-wheel roller, is built around a Fordson tractor. Evan Gooch of Columbia, Tenn., is the owner. (HCEA photo)

This is a 1962 P & H S-20 Stik-Clam, the earliest known compact excavator in the U.S. market and probably 30 years ahead of its time.  The stick-mounted hydraulic clamshell could dig at a wide range of angles, including to a surprising height. HCEA National Director Dave Geis of Seward, Neb., is the owner.
(HCEA photo)
This is a 1962 P & H S-20 Stik-Clam, the earliest known compact excavator in the U.S. market and probably 30 years ahead of its time. The stick-mounted hydraulic clamshell could dig at a wide range of angles, including to a surprising height. HCEA National Director Dave Geis of Seward, Neb., is the owner. (HCEA photo)

Agricat offered a line of small crawler tractors, powered by Wisconsin gas engines, in the 1940s and 1950s. They could be equipped with either dozers or loaders. This example is part of a sizeable collection owned by Jeff Fildes of Grafton, Ohio.
(HCEA photo)
Agricat offered a line of small crawler tractors, powered by Wisconsin gas engines, in the 1940s and 1950s. They could be equipped with either dozers or loaders. This example is part of a sizeable collection owned by Jeff Fildes of Grafton, Ohio. (HCEA photo)

For many years, Struck Corporation has produced a line of tiny crawler tractors and loaders. This is a Magnatrack Junior.
(HCEA photo)
For many years, Struck Corporation has produced a line of tiny crawler tractors and loaders. This is a Magnatrack Junior. (HCEA photo)

The Byers Bearcat Junior, built in the late 1930s, was one of the smallest cable excavators built. With its swing boom, it is in a sense a forebear of today’s compact hydraulic excavators. HCEA National Director Larry Kotkowski is the operator.
(HCEA photo)
The Byers Bearcat Junior, built in the late 1930s, was one of the smallest cable excavators built. With its swing boom, it is in a sense a forebear of today’s compact hydraulic excavators. HCEA National Director Larry Kotkowski is the operator. (HCEA photo)