Flooding

The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) has awarded an emergency contract to begin debris removal at two bridge locations on M-30 in Midland and Gladwin counties, following a historic flooding event in May. M-30 structures over the Tittabawassee River in northern Midland County and over the Tobacco River in Gladwin County were both impacted by flooding.

Sealevel Construction of Thibodaux, La., the company that has been awarded two major contracts for the state's Bayou Chene Flood Control Project, has now earned a National Excellence in Construction (EIC) award for its Falgout Canal Flood Control Structure in Dularge.

On May 17, heavy rains washed out a culvert and earth beneath the eastbound lanes of U.S. 30 near Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County, Ohio. An emergency culvert replacement project began to remove the failed corrugated metal culvert and replace it with a 78-in.

Traffic is flowing again on U.S.-10 near Sanford as the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) reopened a portion of the freeway severely damaged in May flooding. Following completion of the first phase of emergency repairs, MDOT opened the eastbound lanes of U.S.-10 and will use crossovers to allow vehicles to travel in both directions until the westbound lanes can be repaired.

The Mouse River Enhanced Flood Protection Project (MREFPP) is a continuing project in North Dakota that is designed to reduce the risk of future flooding throughout the entire Mouse River Basin. The Mouse River, or the Souris River in Canada, originates in southeast Saskatchewan and travels 357 mi.

Only hours after parts of Michigan experienced what is described as a 500-year flood, Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) engineers were preparing emergency inspection and repair contracts. The floods damaged dozens of bridges, caused the failure of two privately owned dams and closed roads, as well as impacting infrastructure throughout Midland County.

The Trump Administration authorized disaster assistance for more than 27 Kentucky counties and cities on April 24 affected by a weather system that produced extended episodes of strong winds and torrential rain — triggering flooding, flash flooding, landslides and mudslides — between Feb.

O'FALLON, Mo. (AP) With flood concerns already high in the Midwest, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is warning that many levees on the Missouri and Kansas rivers that were damaged during devastating floods last spring remain vulnerable to high water.

In 2017, Astra-Rohadfox UPC JV LP, a joint venture between Astra Group and Rohadfox Construction Control Services Corporation, was selected to deliver the Atlanta Department of Watershed Management's (DWM) Upper Proctor Creek Capacity Relief Facility and the Trust for Public Land's (TPL) Rodney Cook Sr.

Although much work remains following last year's devastating flooding, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Omaha District, has officially closed breaches on the Missouri River Levee System L575. The L575 system provides an initial level of flood risk management to the area behind this downstream portion of the levee.

When the unprecedented and historical flooding started in the Missouri and Platte River basins in March 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Omaha District responded immediately. Within hours, the District, led by the Readiness Branch, was developing plans and sending materials out to fight the flood and provide assistance to communities within harm's way.