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Multi-Phase SR28 Project Begins Near ’Burgh

Tue June 07, 2011 - Northeast Edition
Jennifer Rupp


In Phase 1, Route 28 has been divided into one northbound lane and two southbound lanes in order to construct the new southbound lanes on the west side of the project.
In Phase 1, Route 28 has been divided into one northbound lane and two southbound lanes in order to construct the new southbound lanes on the west side of the project.
In Phase 1, Route 28 has been divided into one northbound lane and two southbound lanes in order to construct the new southbound lanes on the west side of the project. Trumbull Corp. prepares the hillside for the new retaining wall. Wood lagging is placed to support the hill underneath the upcoming concrete retaining wall.

The first phase of the Route 28 Improvement Project in Allegheny County began in August 2010. The project includes 1.5 mi. (2.4 km) of widening and reconstruction, drainage, concrete barrier, concrete curbs and sidewalks, wall construction, and sign structures. Utilities will be updated and/or installed, including highway lighting, signals, Intelligent Transportation System (ITS), and water line and sewer relocation.

The work is located approximately 1,300 ft. north of the 31st Street Bridge (Route 2122) intersection to approximately 2,560 ft. north of the 40th Street Bridge (Route 2124) interchange. Phase 1 is expected to wrap up in the summer of 2012.

This project at the 40th Street Bridge begins a multi-phase, multi-year effort to improve Route 28 from Chestnut Street near the Heinz Plant through the 31st Street Bridge intersection to the Millvale Interchange. The next phase of work at the 31st Street Bridge will begin in 2011 and continue through 2014.

Trumbull Corporation, part of the PJ Dick and Lindy Paving family in Pittsburgh, is heading up the $23 million project. Funding for the job is 80 percent federal and 20 percent state. Trumbull’s tasks include roadway excavation and repaving, construction of the retaining wall, and replacement of the water and sewer lines.

A handful of subcontractors are on the job as well. More Trench of Monroeville is setting the anchors for the retaining wall. Power Contracting Inc. of Pittsburgh is performing all electrical work, including lighting signals and installation of the ITS. Parking Lot Painting Company, based in Bethel Park, was hired for striping; Strongstown B&K of Strongstown will install signage, and Beth’s Barricades out of Gibsonia is in charge of traffic control.

First on the agenda for Trumbull was the demolition of the former Millvale Industrial Park. At one time, the park hosted a meat-packing plant, a printing company, a woodworking shop and a fence company. After demolition, the site is being used as a waste area for a portion of the 20,000 cu. yds. (15,291 cu m) of earth removed during excavation.

The 1.5-mi. project requires 20,000 sq. yds. (16,722 sq m) of full-depth asphalt for the roadway.

The traffic on Route 28 has been shifted, reducing northbound to one lane and keeping southbound two lanes for phase one. This allows crews to construct the new southbound lanes on the west side of Route 28. Later this year, traffic will be shifted to the opposite side in order to construct the new northbound lanes.

“Traffic on Route 28 currently has to pass through traffic lights at 31st Street and 40th Street,” said John Myler, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) project manager. “The new lanes will re-route traffic around the signals, making Route 28 more like an interstate.”

Route 28 traffic cameras are available for public viewing at 511pa.com to allow motorists to plan their route before traveling. An alternate route for outbound traffic is to use the 31st Street Bridge or the 16th Street Bridge to Liberty Avenue, to Butler Street through Lawrenceville, to the 40th Street Bridge or the Highland Park Bridge to bypass the work zone. PennDOT, through a separate contract, constructed improvements at key intersections on the alternate route to facilitate better traffic flow and turning movements. CEG