AGCA

Construction employment increased by 23,000 jobs in August 2018 and by 297,000 jobs over the past year, reaching a 10-year high, while the industry's unemployment rate stood at an all-time low, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of America.

Construction costs climbed again in March, with increases for a wide range of building materials, including many that are subject to proposed tariffs that could drive prices still higher and cause scarcities, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of Labor Department data released April 10.

Construction employment increased in 248 out of 358 metro areas between January 2017 and January 2018, declined in 68 and stagnated in 42, according to a new analysis of federal employment data released today by the Associated General Contractors of America.

The chief executive officer of the Associated General Contractors of America, Stephen E. Sandherr, released the following statement in reaction to the introduction of H.R. 4997, the Giving Retirement Options to Workers Act of 2018, or GROW Act for short by Congressmen Phil Roe and Donald Norcross: "This new Congressional proposal provides attractive new options for many firms that are looking to offer good retirement benefits without incurring the liability that comes with traditional defined benefit plans.

The chief executive officer of the Associated General Contractors of America, Stephen E. Sandherr, released the following statement in reaction to President Trump's State of the Union call for $1.5 trillion in new infrastructure investments and significantly accelerating the approval process for projects:"President Trump understands that the best way to fully capitalize on recently enacted tax reforms is to make significant new investments in infrastructure.

The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) provided has provided checks to construction workers from various companies in the Houston area to help pay for Hurricane Harvey damages. "Contractors may do hard work, but they have soft hearts, especially when it comes to helping some of their own," said Art Daniel, AGC president and head of AR Daniel Construction.

Seventy-five percent of construction firms plan to expand their payrolls in 2018 as contractors are optimistic that economic conditions will remain strong as tax rates and regulatory burdens fall, according to survey results released Jan. 3 by the Associated General Contractors of America and Sage Construction and Real Estate.

Most major construction spending categories increased from July to August but activity was mixed compared to spending levels a year earlier, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials noted that big drops in public investments mean infrastructure will continue to deteriorate and impede economic growth.

The CEO of the Associated General Contractors of America, Stephen E. Sandherr, released the following statement in reaction to the Unified Framework released Sept. 28 by congressional leaders and the Trump administration:"The tax reform framework is a step in the right direction.

Seventy percent of construction firms report they are having a hard time filling hourly craft positions that represent the bulk of the construction workforce, according to the results of an industry-wide survey released today by Autodesk and the Associated General Contractors of America.

Forty-one states added construction jobs between June 2016 and June 2017 amid continuing widespread demand for construction services, while 25 states and the District of Columbia added construction jobs between May and June, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of Labor Department data released July 21.