New Exhibit Tells Tales of West Virginia's Infrastructure History

The “Transportation in West Virginia” exhibit features highlights of the construction of 38,770 miles of public roads through the state’s hilly terrain.

📅   Wed September 06, 2017 - National Edition
Emily Buenzle


The “Transportation in West Virginia” exhibit, which opened Sept. 5 at the Culture Center in Charleston, W.Va., features highlights of the construction of 38,770 miles of public roads through the state's hilly terrain. (Photo Credit: Craig Hudson, Gazette-Mail)
The “Transportation in West Virginia” exhibit, which opened Sept. 5 at the Culture Center in Charleston, W.Va., features highlights of the construction of 38,770 miles of public roads through the state's hilly terrain. (Photo Credit: Craig Hudson, Gazette-Mail)

An exhibit celebrating the history of West Virginia's infrastructure now open for viewing. The “Transportation in West Virginia” exhibit, which opened Sept. 5 at the Culture Center in Charleston, W. Va., features highlights of the construction of 38,770 miles of public roads through the state's hilly terrain, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported.

The exhibit includes:

  • historical construction equipment
  • 20th-century car accessories
  • a wooden replica of the New River Gorge Bridge
  • an 1870s-era brick that was part of the first paved brick street in the country
  • a variety of historical photos of road building, road use, bridges, and more
  • videos about the New River Gorge Bridge and West Virginia Turnpike construction, as well as the collapse of Silver Bridge in 1967
  • information covering West Virginia's first major road construction projects from when the state was still part of Virginia, and much more, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported.
  • “It covers West Virginia road building and bridge construction from the James River and Kanawha Turnpike until today,” said Charles Morris, operations manager for the West Virginia State Museum. “Everything here is from the State Museum collection or from the State Archives. Even the New River Gorge Bridge segment was built by technicians from the State Museum or Culture and History staff.”

    According to Morris, the exhibit helps to commemorate both the 40th anniversary of the New River Gorge Bridge opening and the 50th anniversary of the fatal collapse of the Silver Bridge at Point Pleasant, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported.

    The exhibit will be open to the public until mid-December.