Texas Central Railroad Company

The Webuild Group and its U.S. subsidiary and joint-venture partner Lane Construction are a step closer to starting work on a high-speed railway between Dallas and Houston after the publication of two federal decisions on the historic project that will bring a major boost to the economy and create thousands of jobs.

The Thirteenth Court of Appeals of Texas ruled in favor of Texas Central, holding that it was both a railroad company and interurban electric railway. The Memorandum Opinion, authored by Justice Nora Longoria, held "Having found that the appellants (Texas Central Railroad and Infrastructure, Inc.

Texas Central, developer of the high-speed train, announced a designbuild contract has been signed with the joint venture of Salini Impregilo, one of the largest civil engineering contractors in the world, and its U.S. subsidiary, Lane Construction Corporation.

The Texas high-speed train has been named among the top global infrastructure projects by infrastructure advocacy group CG/LA in its 2019 Strategic 100 Global Infrastructure Report. On the national level, CG/LA ranked the Houston-to-North Texas line as one of America's most important projects.

The selection of the Italian firm, one of the largest civil engineering contractors in the world, reflects the participation of global organizations that are designing and building the high-speed train connecting Houston and North Texas. “Salini Impregilo's knowledge and experience in designing, building and leading large scale railway projects across the world is impressive, and its presence in the U.S.

Texas Central, developers of the high-speed train between North Texas and Houston, announced an agreement on May 2 with Bechtel to work together on project management services. Bechtel has completed more than 300 major train and subway projects, including the Channel Tunnel High Speed 1, Crossrail in London, Riyadh Metro and Dulles Corridor Metrorail in the Washington, D.C., area.

The Texas Bullet Train has made a big push forward as federal regulators for the first time outlined a preferred route between North Texas and Houston and identified passenger station locations. The Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) analysis, completed after nearly four years of work, provides a path for the high-speed train's planning, design and pre-construction phases, and it ensures the safety and environmental wellbeing of counties and communities along the 240-mile route.

In a city whose official seal boasts a train as a symbol of progress, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and the Texas Central railroad company reached agreement on Aug. 17 to work together on an economic development and jobs-creating plan for a bullet train that will revolutionize travel in the state.